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Related terms: Cancer, Leukemia

Childhood Cancer Tied to Raised Risk for Other Ills in Adult Life

Posted 15 days ago by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 – Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, a new study suggests. "Cure is no longer a sufficient goal in childhood cancer care," the researchers wrote. "As the vast majority of these patients survive, attention must be paid to their long-term quality of life and health challenges." In the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 20,000 adults in Denmark, Iceland and Sweden, who had cancer before the age of 20 and survived for at least one year, and compared them to nearly 126,000 adults who did not have childhood cancer. Over an average follow-up of 15 to 19 years, 3.6 percent of childhood cancer survivors were treated in a hospital at least once for an autoimmune disease. That rate is 40 percent higher than among the adults who did not have childhood cancer, according to Dr. Anna Sallfors ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Leukemia, Autoimmune Disorders, Brain Tumor, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Young Cancer Survivors Often Develop New Malignancies

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, a new study reveals. Researchers analyzed U.S. National Cancer Institute data on people who survived cancers before age 40. They had the most common types of cancers in that age group: leukemia, lymphoma, testicular, ovarian, thyroid, breast, soft tissue and bone cancers. "This is a patient demographic that has been largely overlooked," said senior study author Dr. Robert Goldsby, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital. Over 30 years, nearly 14 percent of the survivors were diagnosed with another, different type of cancer. On average, the second cancer occurred within 15 years. Compared to people in the general population, patients successfully treated for cancer between ages 15 and 39 were nearly 60 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Lymphoma, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Testicular Cancer, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

Breast-feeding May Lower Risk of Childhood Leukemia: Study

Posted 1 Jun 2015 by

MONDAY, June 1, 2015 – Breast-feeding – even for a short time – may lower a baby's later risk of childhood leukemia, a new study suggests. The researchers found that babies breast-fed for at least six months appear to have a 19 percent lower risk of childhood leukemia compared to children who were never breast-fed or were breast-fed for fewer months. "Breast-feeding is a highly accessible and low-cost preventive public health measure that has been found in numerous studies to be associated not only with lower risk for childhood leukemia but also with lower risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), gastrointestinal infection, ear infection, type 2 diabetes and obesity later in life," said the study's lead author, Efrat Amitay, of the School of Public Health at the University of Haifa in Israel. "There is, therefore, a distinct public benefit in breast-feeding and it should be ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Lactation Suppression, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Kids Born to Older Dads May Face Risk of Blood Cancers

Posted 12 May 2015 by

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 – Adults who were born to older fathers may be at increased risk for blood and immune system cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma, a new study suggests. This association is particularly strong among only children, the American Cancer Society investigators added. However, the study did not prove there was a cause-and-effect link between the two. There was no association between having an older mother and increased risk of these cancers, according to the study published online May 11 in the American Journal of Epidemiology. "The lifetime risk of these cancers is fairly low – about one in 20 men and women will be diagnosed with lymphoma, leukemia or myeloma at some point during their lifetime – so people born to older fathers should not be alarmed," study leader Lauren Teras said in a journal news release. "Still, the study does highlight the need for more ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma

Contagious Leukemia Killing East Coast Clams

Posted 9 Apr 2015 by

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 – A lethal marine cancer killing clams along North America's East Coast is contagious, new research indicates. Scientists say they've traced leukemia outbreaks among soft-shell clams from New York to Canada back to one case of cancer, which was transmitted to other clams. "The evidence indicates that the tumor cells themselves are contagious – that the cells can spread from one animal to another in the ocean," said researcher Stephen Goff of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Columbia University in New York City. "We know this must be true because the genotypes of the tumor cells do not match those of the host animals that acquire the disease, but instead all derive from a single lineage of tumor cells," Goff explained. The findings, published April 9 in Cell, suggest that cells can survive in seawater long enough to reach and infect a new host. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia

Gene Mutations Tied to Leukemia Rise With Age, Study Finds

Posted 26 Feb 2015 by

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 – For many people, an increase in genetic mutations that could trigger leukemia seems to be an inevitable part of aging, a new study finds. The British researchers looked specifically at mutations in blood stem cells. "Over time, the probability of these cells acquiring mutations rises," co-lead author Thomas McKerrell, of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, said in an institute news release. "What surprised us was that we found these mutations in such a large proportion of elderly people," he added. In the study, researchers looked at more than 4,200 people without any evidence of blood cancer. They found that up to 20 percent of people aged 50 to 60, and more than 70 percent of people older than 90, have blood cells with the same gene changes seen in leukemia. Just carrying a particular mutation doesn't mean that a leukemia is guaranteed, however. "Leukemia ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Leukemia

Breast Cancer Chemo Tied to Small But Significant Leukemia Risk

Posted 5 Jan 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 24, 2014 – Among early stage breast cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy and/or radiation treatment, less than half of one percent will eventually develop leukemia as a result of their treatment, a new analysis reveals. The finding comes from a review of more than 20,000 breast cancer cases treated between 1998 and 2007, and it suggests that the risk for developing treatment-related leukemia, though low, is still double what experts had previously thought. "The frequency of bone marrow cancers such as leukemia is small, there's no question about it," study lead author Dr. Judith Karp, professor emerita of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, noted in a university news release. "However, the cumulative risk over a decade is now shown to be twice as high as we thought it was, and that risk doesn't seem to slow down five years after ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Leukemia

Screening Test Approved for Viruses That Cause Blood Cancer

Posted 11 Dec 2014 by

THURSDAY, Dec. 11, 2014 – A new screening test to detect Human T-Cell Lymphotropic viruses that cause a rare blood cancer has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The viruses, abbreviated HTLV-I/II, cause diseases such as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (blood cancer) and myelopathy (inflammation of spinal cord nerves) , the FDA said in a news release. HTLV can be transmitted via breastfeeding, unprotected sex or blood transfusion. The newly approved test – MP Diagnostics HTLV Blot 2.4 – is meant to supplement existing screening for the viruses, the FDA said. The diagnostic also can differentiate between the two types, HTLV-I or HTLV-II. Many people infected with HTLV may not be aware of its presence, since the virus does not always trigger symptoms. An infected person can transmit the virus without showing any signs or symptoms, the agency said. The new test is ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation

FDA Approves Blincyto (blinatumomab) for Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Posted 3 Dec 2014 by

December 3, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Blincyto (blinatumomab) to treat patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-cell ALL), an uncommon form of ALL. Precursor B-cell ALL is a rapidly growing type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many B-cell lymphoblasts, an immature type of white blood cell. The Philadelphia chromosome is an abnormality that sometimes occurs in the bone marrow cells of leukemia patients. The National Cancer Institute estimates that 6,020 Americans will be diagnosed with ALL and 1,440 will die from the disease in 2014. Blincyto is an example of immunotherapy, a treatment that uses certain parts of a person’s immune system to fight diseases such as cancer. Blincyto is the first approved drug that engages the body’s T-cells, a type of white blood cell or lymphocyte, to des ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Mutations Linked to Blood Cancers Rise With Age, Study Shows

Posted 22 Oct 2014 by

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 – Blood cell mutations linked to the blood cancers leukemia and lymphoma increase as people get older, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed blood samples from nearly 3,000 Americans, ages 10 to 90, and found the mutations in less than 1 percent of those ages 40 to 49. By the time people are between 70 and 79, 5 percent will have blood cell mutations, according to the study. For people between 80 and 89, more than 6 percent will be affected, the researchers found. Cell mutations accumulate as people age, and most are harmless, according to the researchers. They said that having these blood cell mutations associated with leukemia and lymphoma doesn't mean a person will develop these blood cancers. In fact, the diseases occur in less than 0.1 percent of elderly Americans, the researchers noted. "But it's quite striking how many people over age 70 have ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma

Hospital Admission Day Tied to Outcomes for Children With Leukemia

Posted 25 Aug 2014 by

MONDAY, Aug. 25, 2014 – Children with newly diagnosed leukemia who are admitted to the hospital on weekends have a longer hospital stay, wait longer to start chemotherapy and are more likely to suffer respiratory failure than those admitted on weekdays, a new study finds. However, children admitted on weekends did not have a higher risk of death, the researchers added. A team led by Elizabeth Goodman. of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. tracked more than 10,700 first hospitalizations of children with newly diagnosed leukemia. Of those patients, nearly 17 percent were admitted on a weekend. Compared to those admitted on weekdays, patients admitted on weekends stayed in hospital 1.4 days longer, waited an average of about eight hours longer to start chemotherapy and were at higher risk for respiratory failure. The study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship. ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia

FDA Approves Zydelig (idelalisib) for CLL and Lymphoma

Posted 23 Jul 2014 by

July 23, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zydelig (idelalisib) to treat patients with three types of blood cancers. Zydelig is being granted traditional approval to treat patients whose chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has returned (relapsed). Used in combination with Rituxan (rituximab), Zydelig is to be used in patients for whom Rituxan alone would be considered appropriate therapy due to other existing medical conditions (co-morbidities). Zydelig is the fifth new drug with breakthrough therapy designation to be approved by the FDA and the third drug with this designation approved to treat CLL. The FDA is also granting Zydelig accelerated approval to treat patients with relapsed follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (FL) and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), another type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Zydelig is intended to be used in patients who ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma

Experimental Drug May Boost Leukemia Survival, Without Chemo

Posted 12 Mar 2014 by

WEDNESDAY, March 12, 2014 – An experimental drug may extend the lives of people with certain hard-to-treat forms of leukemia and lymphoma – without the need for traditional chemotherapy, according to two studies released Wednesday. The drug, called idelalisib, targets a specific enzyme on white blood cells known as B cells. Researchers found that for people with certain forms of recurrent blood cancers, the drug substantially extended the time that patients lived with no tumor progression. One of the trials, of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), was stopped early because the benefits of idelalisib over standard treatment became so clear. The drug is now up for expedited review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for possible approval. A cancer researcher not involved in either trial called the CLL results "fantastic." If idelalisib is approved, "I think ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Gene Variations Leave Infants at Risk of Leukemia, Study Suggests

Posted 19 Feb 2014 by

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 19, 2014 – Infants who develop leukemia before they're 1 year old have inherited gene mutations that put them at high risk for the disease, a small study suggests. The findings might one day lead to new treatments for leukemia in infants, the study authors said. The causes of cancer in babies have been difficult to pinpoint. For one thing, they haven't been alive long enough to amass the number of gene mutations that can trigger cancer. "Parents always ask why their child has developed leukemia, and unfortunately we have had few answers," study senior author Dr. Todd Druley, a pediatric oncologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said in a university news release. "Our study suggests that babies with leukemia inherit a strong genetic predisposition to the disease," he explained. Druley and his colleagues analyzed the genes of 23 infants with ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia

FDA Approves Imbruvica to Treat Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Posted 12 Feb 2014 by

February 12, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of Imbruvica (ibrutinib) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who have received at least one previous therapy. CLL is a rare blood and bone marrow disease that usually gets worse slowly over time, causing a gradual increase in white blood cells called B lymphocytes, or B cells. The National Cancer Institute estimates that 15,680 Americans were diagnosed and 4,580 died from the disease in 2013. Imbruvica works by blocking the enzyme that allows cancer cells to grow and divide. In November 2013, the FDA granted Imbruvica accelerated approval to treat patients with mantle cell lymphoma, a rare and aggressive type of blood cancer, if those patients received at least one prior therapy. “Today’s approval provides an important new treatment option for CLL patients whose cancer has pro ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Imbruvica, Ibrutinib

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Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Blood Disorders

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