Skip to Content

Join the 'Knee Joint Replacement' group to help and get support from people like you.

Knee Joint Replacement News

Related terms: Total Knee Replacement, Knee Replacement

Tai Chi: Rx for Arthritic Knees

Posted 1 day 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 – Legions of arthritis sufferers try physical therapy and anti-inflammatory drugs to no avail. Now, a new study looks East for relief – to the martial art tai chi. Researchers concluded that tai chi offers an alternative to physical therapy for common knee osteoarthritis – and it might also boost well-being. This ancient Chinese exercise may particularly benefit overweight older adults, the researchers said. Heavier people are more likely to develop osteoarthritis than people with a healthy weight, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "This research strengthened the evidence that the effectiveness and durability of both tai chi and physical therapy extend to obese older adults with knee osteoarthritis," said Dr. Chenchen Wang. "Such people typically face limited options due to ineffectiveness of osteoarthritis treatments," Wang said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Endocet

Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 16, 2016 – There could be a downside to knee replacement: As people get more active, their odds for hip and spinal fractures rise, a new study suggests. One expert wasn't surprised by the finding. While the exact reason for the increase in hip and spine fractures isn't clear, it's most likely due "to improved mobility and activity as a result of the knee replacement surgery," said Dr. Caroline Messer, who specializes in bone loss at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "In addition, patients who chose to have the surgery rather than conservative management of osteoarthritis may have been the same individuals who were determined to lead very active and therefore somewhat riskier lifestyles in the future," said Messer, who directs the hospital's Center for Pituitary and Neuroendocrine Disorders. Almost 720,000 total knee replacements are carried out in the United States ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

Injuries More Common in Teens Who Focus on Single Sport

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 26, 2016 – High school athletes who focus on a single sport may be at increased risk for knee and hip injuries, a new study suggests. "Make sure your children are getting breaks in competition," said study author David Bell, assistant professor in the Departments of Kinesiology and Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "There are so many great aspects to sports participation and we don't want this information to scare athletes or parents – we just want them to be wise consumers and to participate as safely as possible," he said in a university news release. The study included more than 300 athletes at two high schools, one large and one small. About 36 percent of the athletes had high levels of sports specialization. Nearly 29 percent had moderate specialization, and about 35 percent had low specialization, the researchers said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery

Birth Control Pills Linked to Fewer Severe Knee Injuries in Teen Girls

Posted 23 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 – Teen girls who take birth control pills may be less likely to seriously injure their knees than those who don't take the pill, a new study suggests. "Young athletes currently use birth control pills for various reasons, including more predictable cycles and lighter periods," said study author Aaron Gray, an M.D./Ph.D. student at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. "Injury risk reduction could potentially be added to that list," he said, if future studies confirm what the new study found. The study did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between birth control pills and knee injuries. The researchers only found an association between these factors. Female athletes are up to twice as likely to suffer an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury as male athletes, the study authors said. The ACL connects the top and bottom parts of the knee. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Surgery, Emergency Contraception, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Implanon, Provera, Nexplanon, Depo-Provera, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Plan B One-Step, TriNessa

Acetaminophen Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds

Posted 18 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 – Acetaminophen – commonly known as Tylenol in the United States – isn't an effective choice for relieving osteoarthritis pain in the hip or knee, or for improving joint function, a new study finds. Although the drug rated slightly better than placebo in studies, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or diclofenac are better choices for short-term pain relief, the researchers said. "Regardless of dose, the prescription drug diclofenac is the most effective drug among painkillers in terms of improving pain and function in osteoarthritis," said lead researcher Dr. Sven Trelle. He's co-director of clinical trials at the University of Bern in Switzerland. However, even diclofenac comes with side effects. "If you are thinking of using a painkiller for osteoarthritis, you should consider diclofenac," Trelle said, but also ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin

Botox-Like Injection Might Ease Runners' Knee Pain

Posted 23 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 – A Botox-like injection, added to physical therapy, may relieve a type of knee pain that's common in runners, cyclists and other active people, a new study suggests. The condition – called lateral patellofemoral overload syndrome (LPOS) – affects more than one in eight people who regularly exercise, the British research team explained. The condition causes pain in the front and side of the knee joint, and healing can be a challenge, experts said. "Knee pain in runners and cyclists is often difficult to treat," said Dr. Victor Khabie, chief of sports medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. "Most will respond well to traditional therapy, but some will continue to have pain." According to the study authors, prior research has shown that 80 percent of people with LPOS have ongoing symptoms after undergoing conventional treatment, and 74 ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Chronic Pain, Botox, Knee Joint Replacement, Breakthrough Pain, Dysport

Health Tip: Using a Knee Brace

Posted 8 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- A knee brace offers support and stability for an injured or weak knee. But it must be worn properly. The American Academy of Family Physicians offers these guidelines: Your doctor may suggest wearing a knee brace during sports. Put the brace on properly, so the hinges line up with the bend of the knee. Make sure the fasteners are properly applied around the leg. As you exercise, check the brace occasionally to make sure that it hasn't slipped out of position. There are different types of knee braces. They may be recommended after knee surgery or an injury, such as a torn ligament. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Joint Infection

Obesity Linked to More Severe Bone, Joint Injuries

Posted 4 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 4, 2015 – Obesity complicates the treatment of broken bones and other major joint injuries, a new study suggests. "Overall, this study found an association between obesity and increased rates of lower-extremity injuries and orthopedic surgery," said lead author and orthopedic surgeon Dr. Heather Licht. However, the study did not prove that obesity causes orthopedic injuries and related surgeries. For the study, researchers from Baylor Scott & White Health in Temple, Texas, analyzed data from 300 patients treated for multiple orthopedic injuries at U.S. trauma centers between 2006 and 2011. The investigators found that 72 percent of obese patients required surgery, compared with about 55 percent of non-obese patients. The more obese a patient was, the greater the likelihood of surgery, the study authors reported. While 67 percent of patients with the lowest level of obesity ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Joint Infection

MRI Can Spot Early Signs of Knee Arthritis: Study

Posted 2 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2, 2015 – MRIs can spot the warning signs of knee osteoarthritis in people who have normal X-rays, researchers report. They looked at 849 people, average age of 60, who showed no evidence of arthritis in either knee in X-rays. They were deemed at high risk due to factors such as being overweight or having a history of knee injuries. The Northwestern University team also assessed cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions and meniscus tears on MRI images taken three years apart. If the MRIs showed worsening damage during that time, the patients were at increased risk of developing knee arthritis or symptoms such as pain, stiffness and/or swelling. Depending on the type of lesion revealed by MRI, the risk of developing knee arthritis within three years was three to 20 times greater, the researchers said. "These worsening lesions are an early warning sign and an opportunity to ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging

Long-Distance Running Takes Toll on Joints, But It May Be Temporary

Posted 30 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 – Runners who run very long distances suffer cartilage damage in their lower joints – but the cartilage can regenerate, a small study suggests. The researchers also found that the runners had lost about 6 percent of their brain's gray matter by the end of the race. But eight months later, their gray matter volume had returned to normal. The study included 44 runners taking part in the 2009 Trans Europe Foot Race, which involved running nearly 4,500 kilometers (about 2,800 miles) over two months without any days of rest. Using a mobile MRI truck, the researchers scanned the runners every three or four days during the event. Nearly all cartilage in knee, ankle and hind-foot joints showed significant deterioration in the first 900 to 1,550 miles of the race. The findings are to be presented Monday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, ... Read more

Related support groups: Knee Joint Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation

Weight Loss May Spare Knee Cartilage, Study Finds

Posted 30 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 – Losing a large amount of weight slows the loss of knee cartilage in obese people, a new study shows. Obesity is a major risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that often leads to joint replacement surgery. The new study included just over 500 overweight and obese Americans who either had mild to moderate osteoarthritis or risk factors for the disease. The study participants were randomly assigned to a control group that lost no weight, a group that lost a little weight, or a group that lost more than 10 percent of their body weight. Four years of follow-up showed significant weight loss protected against cartilage degeneration and that larger amounts of weight loss provided more protection, according to the study to be presented Monday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, in Chicago. Research presented at ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Osteoarthritis, Weight Loss, Knee Joint Replacement

Weight-Loss Surgery Often Brings Less Painful Joints: Study

Posted 4 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 – Aching knee and hip joints may hurt less after successful weight-loss surgery, a new study suggests. "In particular, walking is easier, which impacts patients' ability to adopt a more physically active lifestyle," lead researcher Wendy King said in a news release from the ObesityWeek meeting. Weight-loss surgery isn't a "magic bullet" for joint pain for every patient, however. "Some patients continue to have significant pain and disability" even after the operation, said King, who is an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health. King's team was to present the findings Wednesday at the ObesityWeek meeting in Los Angeles, which is hosted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and The Obesity Society. In the study, the researchers tracked outcomes for more than 2,200 obese people, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Weight Loss, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

Knee Replacement Brings Less Pain, Better Function

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – Total knee replacement usually results in greater pain relief and better joint function after a year than nonsurgical arthritis treatment, researchers report. But baby boomers shouldn't automatically rule out physical therapy for moderate to severe knee arthritis, the authors of the new study said. "There are nearly 700,000 knee replacements done in the United States each year, but evidence of their benefit has been lacking," said lead author Soren Thorgaard Skou, a researcher in the musculoskeletal function and physiotherapy unit at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense. By 2010, knee replacement had become the leading inpatient surgery performed on adults 45 and over in the United States, according to data from the U.S. National Hospital Discharge Survey. Average age of the recipients was 66. For the study, Skou's team randomly assigned 100 patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Surgery, Osteoarthritis, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Obesity Won't Affect Joint Surgery Safety, Study Finds

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – Obese and overweight people who have joint replacement surgeries are less likely to need blood transfusions and are no more likely to face complications than normal weight patients, a new analysis finds. "It's a very complex issue," said study co-author Dr. Nolan Wessell, an orthopaedic surgery resident at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. "And this finding is somewhat surprising. "But it could just be that larger patients have a larger total blood value," he added. "And therefore lose a lower percentage of their blood than smaller patients during surgery. Essentially, it may be that they have a larger reserve in their tank, and can afford to lose a bit more blood without needing a transfusion. We don't know. But at least conceptually that makes sense." Still, senior study author Dr. Craig Silverton, vice chairman of orthopaedics at Henry Ford, cautioned that more ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

More Americans Getting Knees Replaced, And at Younger Ages

Posted 2 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 – Aging baby boomers are getting bum knees replaced at a greater rate, and at a younger age, than ever before, a new U.S. study confirms. The data, from the National Hospital Discharge Survey, shows that between 2000 and 2010, more than 5.2 million total knee replacements were performed in the United States. By 2010, the operation had become the leading inpatient surgery performed on adults aged 45 and over. The rate at which middle-aged and older Americans got their knees replaced almost doubled over the years covered by the study, for men and women, the researchers found. People aren't putting off the procedure for as long, either. In 2000, the average knee replacement patient was about 69 years old, but by 2010 that age had dropped to just over 66, the findings showed. One expert said there's been a change in doctors' and patients' attitudes toward the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Page 1 2 3 4 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Orthopedic Surgery