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Blood Pressure Drugs Help Keep Heart Trouble at Bay: FDA

Posted 6 May 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 6, 2014 – High blood pressure affects about one-third of American adults and raises their risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure, kidney failure and death, but there are many medications available to lower blood pressure. Exercise, weight loss and reduced salt intake can help some people lower their blood pressure, but most have to take medications to bring their blood pressure under control, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. In many cases, patients with high blood pressure require more than one medication to achieve their target blood pressure. Your doctor can determine if you need to be on medication and, if so, which drug(s) may be best for you. There are a number of FDA-approved drugs to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics, or "water pills," help the kidneys remove extra water and salt from your body and decrease blood volume. ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Amlodipine, Benicar, Losartan, Diovan, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Verapamil, Cozaar, Micardis, Ramipril, Cardizem, Nifedipine, Enalapril, Benazepril, Avapro, Atacand, Valsartan

Health Tip: When Food and Drugs Interact

Posted 27 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

-- When food and drinks interact with medication, the medication may not work sufficiently or the drug can become too powerful as the body has trouble handling it properly. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics mentions these common examples of food and drug interaction: Grapefruit juice interacts with several drugs and may affect the way the body metabolizes medication. Drugs that may interact with grapefruit juice include: some statins, antihistamines, thyroid medications, blood pressure medications, birth control pills, cough suppressants and medications that block stomach acids. Blood-thinning medications can interact with leafy green vegetables, affecting the blood's clotting ability. Natural black licorice may interact with certain blood pressure medications and blood-thinning medications. Salt substitutes can interact with ACE inhibitors and digoxin. Tyramine (found in foods ... Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, Codeine, Provera, NuvaRing, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Depo-Provera, Amlodipine, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Loestrin 24 Fe, Lutera, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Lipitor, Benadryl, Simvastatin, Ortho Evra

Calcium Channel Blockers for Blood Pressure Linked to Breast Cancer Risk, Study Finds

Posted 5 Aug 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 5 – Postmenopausal women who use a type of blood pressure-lowering medication called a calcium channel blocker may have increased odds of developing breast cancer, new research suggests. Long-time users of these drugs have more than double the risk for getting breast cancer compared to women not using the medications, according to the study, published Aug. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine. "We looked at these drugs because people who use them to manage their blood pressure are usually on them for the rest of their lives," said the study's lead author, Dr. Christopher Li, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. "There has been some evidence suggesting that some of these antihypertensives may be related to breast cancer risk." The study of nearly 3,000 women found that among high blood pressure drugs, only calcium channel blockers carry the heightened breast ... Read more

Related support groups: Amlodipine, Breast Cancer, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Verapamil, Nifedipine, Cardizem, Cardizem CD, Procardia, Felodipine, Adalat, Procardia XL, Cartia XT, Cardizem LA, Plendil, Calan, Isoptin, Nifediac CC, Calan SR, Sular

Consider Weight When Choosing Blood Pressure Meds: Study

Posted 6 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 6 – Taking a patient's weight into account when choosing blood pressure medications might help prevent strokes, heart attacks and death, a new study suggests. Lean and obese people react differently to different blood pressure medications, said the researchers, who believe their findings could change the way high blood pressure (hypertension) is treated. "Unexpectedly, people who have high blood pressure and are fat actually have a better prognosis than people who have high blood pressure and are thin," said lead researcher Dr. Michael Weber, a professor of medicine at Downstate Medical Center of the State University of New York in New York City. "You can now choose blood pressure medication as a means of compensating for this difference between obese and thin people, so that it's possible to treat everybody with a medicine that maximizes the outcome regardless of how ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Amlodipine, Heart Attack, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Verapamil, Ramipril, Nifedipine, Cardizem, Enalapril, Benazepril, Myocardial Infarction, Cardizem CD, Procardia, Felodipine, Perindopril, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Adalat

Fainting Spells Often Tied to Too Many Meds at Once: Study

Posted 4 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 4 – Taking too many medications at the same time could lead to repeated fainting episodes, a new study reveals. "Simply stated, the more antihypertensive pills a patient takes, the greater the likelihood of a possible fainting spell under certain circumstances," explained one cardiologist, Dr. David Friedman, chief of Heart Failure Services at North Shore-LIJ's Plainview Hospital in Plainview, N.Y. He was not involved in the new research. In the study, Danish researchers led by Dr. Martin Ruwald of Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte looked at more than 127,000 patients, median age 64, who were hospitalized for fainting between 1997 and 2009. Of those patients, more than one-fifth had experienced at least two fainting episodes. The researchers found that the risk of repeat fainting rose with the number of medications that patients were taking at the same time. For ... Read more

Related support groups: Lisinopril, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Amlodipine, Benicar, Losartan, Diovan, Hydrochlorothiazide, Bystolic, Lasix, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Spironolactone, Verapamil, Furosemide, Cozaar, Micardis, Ramipril, Cardizem, Nifedipine

U.S. Task Force Issues Blood Pressure Guidelines

Posted 15 May 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 15 – "Team-based care" should be used to improve patients' blood pressure control, the U.S. Task Force on Community Preventive Services recommended on Tuesday. The recommendation is based on a review of 77 studies that showed improvements in patients' control of blood pressure when they received care from a team of health professionals – a primary care doctor supported by a pharmacist, nurse, dietitian, social worker, or community health worker – rather than a primary care doctor alone. The task force found that team-based care increased the percentage of patients with controlled blood pressure, led to a decrease in both systolic (top number) and diastolic (bottom number) blood pressure, and improved results in patients with diabetes and elevated levels of blood fats. Team members assist primary care doctors by providing support and sharing responsibility for high blood ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Amlodipine, Benicar, Losartan, Diovan, Propranolol, Bystolic, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Verapamil, Carvedilol, Cozaar, Micardis, Coreg, Ramipril, Cardizem

Accidental Medication Poisonings in Kids on the Rise

Posted 16 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 – Despite ongoing prevention efforts, a growing number of young children are being accidentally poisoned with medications, according to new research. The study, which was based on data reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers between 2001 and 2008, found that medication poisoning among children aged 5 and under increased by 22 percent, although the number of children in the United States in this age group rose by only 8 percent during the study period. "The problem of pediatric poisoning in the U.S. is getting worse, not better," Dr. Randall Bond, of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a hospital news release. In conducting the study, which is scheduled for publication in the Journal of Pediatrics, the researchers reviewed information on over 544,000 children who landed in the emergency department due to medication poisoning ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Xanax, Oxycodone, Methadone, Percocet, Hydrocodone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Klonopin, Lisinopril, Morphine, Norco, Fentanyl, Lortab, Clonazepam, Ambien, Valium, Ativan, Codeine, Opana

Two Different Heart Drugs May Work Equally Well for High-Risk Patients

Posted 6 Apr 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 5 – People with high blood pressure and impaired glucose tolerance seem to fare equally well when given two separate types of heart drugs, new research suggests. Although an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) and a calcium channel blocker were both effective in this patient population, one difference did emerge, according to a presentation given Tuesday at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology in New Orleans: People taking Diovan (valsartan), an ARB, had a lower incidence of being hospitalized for congestive heart failure. "We could not find any differences between the two groups in terms of blood pressure control and hemoglobin A1c levels, and we couldn't find any difference in the primary composite endpoint between the two groups," said study author Dr. Toyoaki Murohara, a professor of cardiology at Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine in ... Read more

Related support groups: Amlodipine, Benicar, Losartan, Diovan, Heart Failure, Norvasc, Diltiazem, Congestive Heart Failure, Verapamil, Cozaar, Micardis, Nifedipine, Cardizem, Avapro, Atacand, Valsartan, Irbesartan, Telmisartan, Cardizem CD, Procardia

Some Antibiotics, Blood Pressure Meds a Bad Mix: Study

Posted 17 Jan 2011 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 17 – Older people who are taking common blood pressure medications called calcium channel blockers face an increased risk of developing dangerously low blood pressure and possibly going into shock if they take certain antibiotics, Canadian researchers warn. "Two common antibiotics, erythromycin and clarithromycin, if given to patients taking calcium channel blockers, can increase the risk substantially of being hospitalized for low blood pressure," said lead researcher Dr. David Juurlink, a scientist at Sunnybrook Research Institute in Toronto. For patients taking erythromycin along with a calcium channel blocker the risk goes up almost sixfold, while it increases almost fourfold for patients taking clarithromycin, he said. Although the interaction between these drugs has been known for some 20 years, this is the first time the risk has been quantified, Juurlink said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Amlodipine, Norvasc, Diltiazem, Verapamil, Erythromycin, Nifedipine, Cardizem, Clarithromycin, Biaxin, Cardizem CD, Felodipine, Procardia, Adalat, Procardia XL, Cartia XT, Cardizem LA, Erythrocin, Plendil, Ery-Tab, Calan

More Evidence That Swings in Blood Pressure Raise Stroke Risk

Posted 15 Mar 2010 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, March 14 --Following on recent, similar research, a large five-year study points to fluctuations in blood pressure over time as a key indicator of stroke risk. In the study, British researchers tracked the health of more than 19,000 patients taking either beta blockers or calcium channel blocker medication to curb high blood pressure. Patients who placed in the highest 10 percent in terms of swings in blood pressure between doctor visits had about four times the risk of stroke compared to those with the least variable blood pressure, the researchers reported. Similar results occurred when the researchers analyzed patients' risks for heart attack. Overall, patients who took calcium channel blockers had a 22 percent lower risk of stroke vs. those who took beta blockers, and differences in blood pressure variability between the two groups seemed to explain the gap in risk. The ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Amlodipine, Propranolol, Bystolic, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Verapamil, Carvedilol, Coreg, Cardizem, Nifedipine, Bisoprolol, Inderal, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol

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High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Raynaud's Syndrome, Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis

Related Drug Support Groups

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