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Related terms: Cholesteremia, Cholesterol, Elevated Levels, Cholesterol, High, Cholesterolemia, Familial Hypercholesterolemia, Hypercholesterolemia, Hypercholesterolemia, Familial, Hyperlipidemia, Lipid Metabolism Disorders

Sharp Spike Seen in Statin Use in Elderly Without Heart Disease

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 24, 2015 – There has been a sharp rise in the use of cholesterol-lowering statins among elderly patients who do not have heart disease, a new study finds. But there is little research to guide the use of these medicines in this group of patients, the investigators added. In the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 13,000 people who took part in an annual national survey between 1999 and 2012. "We found high rates of statin use in primary prevention among patients older than 79 years old who didn't have vascular disease," lead investigator Dr. Michael Johansen, a family medicine physician at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center, said in a university news release. Rates of heart disease among the very elderly people rose from about 28 percent in 1999-2000 to nearly 44 percent in 2011-12, but this increase was believed to be related to survey methods. Over ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, Red Yeast Rice, Livalo, Pravachol, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hyperlipoproteinemia, Lescol, Lescol XL, Mevacor, Baycol, Fluvastatin

Vitamin D Supplements Little Help for Obese Teens, Study Finds

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 14, 2015 – Taking vitamin D supplements does not benefit obese teens and may actually harm their health, new research indicates. Studies have suggested a link between vitamin D deficiency and problems such as insulin resistance and heart disease, and some doctors put obese teens on high-dose vitamin D supplementation to try to slow or reverse such obesity-related health problems. But this latest research found the supplements do not improve obese teens' heart health or reduce their diabetes risk, said Dr. Seema Kumar, a pediatric endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn. In addition, the supplements may be linked to increased levels of cholesterol and fat-storing triglycerides, according to a Mayo Clinic news release. "After three months of having vitamin D boosted into the normal range with supplements, these teenagers showed no changes in ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, High Cholesterol, Caltrate 600 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Os-Cal 500 with D, Citracal + D, Oysco 500 with D, Oyster Shell Calcium, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcium 600 D, Calcet, Calcarb with D, O-Cal-D, Oyst-Cal-D, UPCal D, Risacal-D, Os-Cal 500 + D, Oystercal-D, Os-Cal with D

Screen Teens With Depression for Heart Disease, Experts Say

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 – Teens with major depression or bipolar disorder may face a higher risk for heart disease and they need to be followed closely, new recommendations from the American Heart Association state. "Youth with mood disorders are not yet widely recognized as a group at increased risk for excessive and early heart disease. We hope these guidelines will spur action from patients, families and health care providers to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease among these youth," Dr. Benjamin Goldstein, a child-adolescent psychiatrist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center at the University of Toronto, said in a heart association news release. Goldstein and his colleagues reviewed published studies and found that teens with major depression or bipolar disorder were more likely than other teens to have: high blood pressure; high cholesterol; obesity, especially around the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Major Depressive Disorder, High Cholesterol, Angina, Dysthymia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

New Drug Lowers Levels of Triglyceride Blood Fats: Study

Posted 29 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 – An experimental drug dramatically lowers blood levels of potentially harmful triglycerides, a new study finds. Triglycerides are a type of blood fat created by the food you eat. At very high levels, they can cause heart problems and pancreatitis, an inflammation of the pancreas. "Current treatment for elevated triglyceride [levels] leaves a lot to be desired," said researcher Dr. Joseph Witztum, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego. "This drug holds the promise that it will be the most effective therapy we have." The new drug – called ISIS 304801 for now – lowers triglyceride levels by as much as 71 percent without unpleasant side effects, the study found. Elevated triglycerides can be caused by genetics as well as obesity, smoking, drinking too much alcohol and a diet very high in carbohydrates, the American Heart Association ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Hypertriglyceridemia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

FDA OKs Praluent - First of New Class of Cholesterol Drugs

Posted 27 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved Praluent, the first of a powerful new class of injected, cholesterol-lowering drugs that experts believe could change cardiovascular care. Praluent (alirocumab) sharply cuts levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol, and is one of a group of newly developed drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors, the FDA explained in a news release. The drug is only approved for patients with heart disease and a history of heart attack or stroke "who require additional lowering of LDL cholesterol" in addition to taking a statin drug and adopting a healthy diet, the agency said. It is also for use by patients with a condition called heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH), an inherited illness that causes people to have high levels of LDL in the blood. "Praluent provides another treatment option for patients with HeFH or with ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Praluent, Alirocumab

Praluent Approved to Treat High Cholesterol

Posted 27 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 – Praluent (alirocumab) injection has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat people with inherited high cholesterol (heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia) or people at risk of heart attack or stroke from high cholesterol derived from foods or produced by the liver. The drug is sanctioned for people who do not benefit enough from improved diet and the use of cholesterol-lowering statins. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the so-called "bad cholesterol") is linked to cardiovascular disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American men and women, killing some 610,000 people every year, the FDA said in a news release. Praluent is the first-approved drug in a new class of medications called proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors. The drug is an antibody that inhibits the PCSK9 protein, which allows ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Praluent, Alirocumab

FDA Approves Praluent (alirocumab) to Treat Certain Patients with High Cholesterol

Posted 27 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

July 24, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Praluent (alirocumab) injection, the first cholesterol-lowering treatment approved in a new class of drugs known as proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors. Praluent is approved for use in addition to diet and maximally tolerated statin therapy in adult patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) or patients with clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease such as heart attacks or strokes, who require additional lowering of LDL cholesterol. HeFH is an inherited condition that causes high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. A high level of LDL cholesterol (known as “bad” cholesterol) in the blood is linked to cardiovascular disease. Heart disease is the number one cause of death for Americans, both men and women. According to the Centers for Disease Con ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Praluent, Alirocumab

Wider Use of Statin Drugs Could Save Thousands More Lives: Report

Posted 14 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 – New expert guidelines from two major cardiologists' groups may boost doctors' ability to spot patients who should take cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, researchers said. The updated guidelines were released in 2013 by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. Now, a new report finds they are more accurate and efficient than earlier guidelines in identifying adults at high risk for heart trouble who could gain from statins. All of that should add up to lives saved, the researchers said. "Extrapolating our results to the approximately 10 million U.S. adults who would be newly eligible for statin therapy under the new guidelines, we estimate that between 41,000 and 63,000 cardiovascular events – heart attacks, strokes or deaths from cardiovascular disease – would be prevented over a 10-year period," lead researcher Dr. Udo Hoffman, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Red Yeast Rice, Livalo, Pravachol, High Cholesterol - Familial Homozygous, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hyperlipoproteinemia, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Calcium Scan Can Predict Premature Death Risk, Study Says

Posted 6 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 – A scan of calcium deposits inside your arteries can help doctors deduce how long you're likely to live, a new study has found. The test, called a coronary calcium scan, uses a regular CT scan to look for calcium deposits in the three major arteries that carry blood away from the heart, said lead author Leslee Shaw, a professor of cardiology at Emory University in Atlanta. People with the largest amounts of calcium in their arteries carry an early death risk that's six times greater than those with no calcium deposits, researchers found in a 15-year study of nearly 10,000 patients. "If you had no calcium or very small amounts, we were able to track over a very long time that you actually had a very outstanding survival," Shaw said. Calcium deposits develop as a response to plaque formation along the artery walls, Shaw said. These plaques, which are caused by blood ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Red Yeast Rice, Livalo, Pravachol, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Hyperlipoproteinemia, Lescol, Lescol XL, Mevacor, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Altoprev

Do Cholesterol Drugs Affect Aggression?

Posted 1 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 – Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs might influence a person's aggressive behaviors, increasing or decreasing their irritability and violent tendencies, a new clinical trial suggests. Men taking statins typically become less aggressive, while women on statins tend to become more aggressive, according to findings published July 1 in the journal PLOS ONE. "Clinicians should be aware of this, and it's not bad for patients to be aware of it," said lead author Dr. Beatrice Golomb, a principal investigator at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. "If an individual develops a behavioral change, in my view medication should always be considered as a possibility." However, the effect appears to be minimal and needs to be verified with follow-up studies, said one outside expert, Robert Geffner, founding president of the Institute on Violence, Abuse & ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Red Yeast Rice, Livalo, Pravachol, High Cholesterol - Familial Homozygous, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IIa (Elevated LDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia, Lescol, Lescol XL, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IIb (Elevated LDL + VLDL)

Half of U.S. Hispanics With High Cholesterol Unaware They Have It: Study

Posted 24 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2015 – Nearly half of Hispanic people in the United States with high cholesterol levels aren't aware they have the health problem and more than two-thirds who are aware aren't being treated, a new study indicates. Reviewing data from more than 16,000 Hispanics between the ages of 18 and 74, the researchers found that about 44 percent of men and 40 percent of women had high cholesterol, greater proportions overall than among the general U.S. population. Almost one-third of all American adults have high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cholesterol, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and less than a third have the condition under control. High cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for developing heart disease or stroke since a build-up of the fatty substance can narrow blood vessels and hinder blood flow to the heart ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Hypertriglyceridemia, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, High Cholesterol - Familial Homozygous, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IIa (Elevated LDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IIb (Elevated LDL + VLDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia Type III (Elevated beta-VLDL + IDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IV (Elevated VLDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia Type V (Elevated Chylomicrons + VLDL)

Health Tip: What's Behind High Cholesterol?

Posted 24 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- High cholesterol is a risk factor for serious health problems, from heart attack to stroke. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute mentions these possible causes: Eating a diet high in cholesterol-rich foods, such as meat, cheese, egg yolks and other animal products. Foods high in saturated and trans fats also increase cholesterol. Being overweight or lack of physical activity can lead to extra pounds and boost cholesterol. Being age 55 or older increases your risk of high cholesterol. Having an inherited condition called familial cholesterolemia leads to high cholesterol. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Cholesterol, Hypertriglyceridemia, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, High Cholesterol - Familial Homozygous, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IIa (Elevated LDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IIb (Elevated LDL + VLDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia Type V (Elevated Chylomicrons + VLDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia Type III (Elevated beta-VLDL + IDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IV (Elevated VLDL)

Can U.S. Health-Care System Afford New, Improved Cholesterol Drugs?

Posted 18 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 18, 2015 – A new class of powerful cholesterol drugs is poised to hit the market, and doctors are both hopeful about their potential, and worried that insurers won't pay for them. The drugs, known as PCSK9 inhibitors, can drastically cut LDL cholesterol – the "bad" kind linked to increased risks of heart attack and stroke. And they are expected to open up a new option for people who cannot take statins, the drugs that have been the standard for cholesterol-lowering since the 1980s. Last week, an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended the agency approve two PCSK9 inhibitors: alirocumab (Praluent) and evolocumab (Repatha). The FDA, which usually follows the recommendations of its advisory panels, is expected to OK both drugs. Some cardiologists have heralded PCSK9 inhibitors as a breakthrough – particularly for patients who can't take statins ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Zetia, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Red Yeast Rice, Livalo, Pravachol, High Cholesterol - Familial Homozygous, Ezetimibe, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type IIa (Elevated LDL), Hyperlipoproteinemia, Lescol

Exercise May Have Benefits Beyond Fitness in Type 2 Diabetes

Posted 17 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 17, 2015 – Exercise appears to benefit people with type 2 diabetes in a number of ways, a new study suggests. Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas looked at health records from people with type 2 diabetes. They found that people who exercised had lower body fat, smaller waist size and better blood sugar control than people who were inactive. The positive effects of exercise were seen whether people did aerobic exercise, resistance training or a combination of the two. People also saw positive effects from exercise even if they didn't have any improvement in their heart/lung (cardiorespiratory) fitness, the investigators found. "What we observed is that exercise improves diabetes control regardless of improvement in exercise capacity," co-author Dr. Jarett Berry, associate professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences at UT ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Weight Loss, High Cholesterol, Glipizide, Actos, Glyburide, Glimepiride, Amaryl, Pioglitazone, Avandia, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, DiaBeta, Rosiglitazone, Glynase, Chlorpropamide, Micronase, Tolazamide

FDA Tells Food Industry to Stop Using Artificial Trans Fats

Posted 16 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 16, 2015 – In a move that it says is designed to protect the heart health of Americans, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that food manufacturers have three years to remove artificial trans fats from the nation's food supply. The FDA ruled that partially hydrogenated oils – the major source of trans fats in the American diet – are no longer "generally recognized as safe," the designation that for decades has allowed companies to use the oils in a wide variety of food products. Consuming trans fats simultaneously increases "bad" LDL cholesterol and drives down "good" HDL cholesterol in a person's bloodstream. The FDA has estimated that removing partially hydrogenated oils from food could prevent as many as 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths from heart disease every year. Partially hydrogenated oils are created by pumping hydrogen into vegetable oil to ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, High Cholesterol, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

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