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Heart Disease Blog

Related terms: Congenital Heart Disease

Coffee May Help Men Keep Impotence at Bay

Posted 21 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 – Coffee perks millions of Americans up each morning, and a new study finds it might help keep men's sex lives percolating, too. The study, from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, found that men who consume more caffeine each day had a lower risk of erectile dysfunction. The exception? Men with diabetes – for them, extra caffeine didn't lower their odds for impotence, the researchers said. "Even though we saw a reduction in the prevalence of erectile dysfunction with men who were obese, overweight and hypertensive, that was not true of men with diabetes. Diabetes is one of the strongest risk factors for erectile dysfunction, so this was not surprising," lead author Dr. David Lopez, assistant professor at UTHealth School of Public Health, said in a university news release. The study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, but one expert said the ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Erectile Dysfunction, Heart Disease, Caffeine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Alert, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Esgic, Diabetes Mellitus, Esgic-Plus, Fioricet with Codeine, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine, Excedrin Extra Strength

Heart Risk Factors May Harm Black Women More Than Whites

Posted 1 day 17 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 – The cluster of heart risk factors known as the "metabolic syndrome" might raise the risk of heart disease more for black women than it does for white women, a new study suggests. Metabolic syndrome refers to having at least three health conditions – including a large waist size, high blood pressure, low levels of "good" HDL cholesterol, high levels of blood fats called triglycerides, and impaired sugar metabolism – that can all work together to boost the odds of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. In the new study, a team led by Dr. Michelle Schmiegelow at University Hospital Gentofte in Denmark looked at data from more than 14,000 American women, aged 50 to 79. All were taking part in a long-term national study. About 47 percent were white, 36 percent were black and 18 percent were Hispanic. Over 13 years of follow-up, about 1,100 of the women were ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Angina, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Metabolic Disorder Including Congenital

Bullied as a Kid, Obese as a Grown-up?

Posted 1 day 21 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 – Adults who were bullied in childhood may be at an increased risk for obesity, heart disease and diabetes, a new British study suggests. "Our research has already shown a link between childhood bullying and risk of mental health disorders in children, adolescents and adults, but this study is the first to widen the spectrum of adverse outcomes to include risks for cardiovascular disease at mid-life," said senior study author Louise Arseneault. She is a professor from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King's College London. "Evidently, being bullied in childhood does get under your skin," she said in a college news release. Arseneault and her colleagues analyzed data from more than 7,100 people in a long-term study of all children born in England, Scotland and Wales during one week in 1958. Their parents provided information on whether ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Diabetes Mellitus

One-Third of Americans Have Dangerous Mix of Heart Risk Factors

Posted 2 days 20 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 19, 2015 – More than one-third of U.S. adults have a combination of health problems collectively known as metabolic syndrome that increase the risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to new research. What's worse, the researchers found the rate of metabolic syndrome increases dramatically with age. Almost half of people 60 or older in the United States have metabolic syndrome, the study found. "That's concerning, because we know the population of the U.S. is aging," said senior author Dr. Robert Wong, an assistant clinical professor at University of California, San Francisco. "I think it will potentially place a huge burden on our health care system." Metabolic syndrome is a "perfect storm" of conditions that include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, increased levels of blood sugar, and a wider waist circumference, Wong said. Medical experts are ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Niacin, Angina, Zocor, Niaspan, Lovastatin, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Vytorin, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia

Many ER Patients With Chest Pain Can Be Sent Home, Study Finds

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 18, 2015 – While chest pain sends many people to the nearest hospital emergency department, most patients may not need a costly hospital stay as a result, a new study suggests. According to a news release from Ohio State University, chest pain sends more than 7 million Americans to the ER every year and about half of them are then admitted for further observation, testing or treatment. But is the cost and inconvenience of a hospital stay always warranted? The study aimed to "assess whether this population of patients could safely go home and do further outpatient testing within a day or two," lead researcher Dr. Michael Weinstock, a professor of emergency medicine at the university's College of Medicine, said in the news release. His team looked at data from more than 11,000 visits by patients experiencing chest pain to three hospitals in Columbus, Ohio between 2008 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Attack, Tachyarrhythmia, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Bradyarrhythmia, Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Diagnosis and Investigation, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Hand-Grip Strength May Provide Clues to Heart Health

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 – Testing hand-grip strength could be a cheap and simple way of identifying people at increased risk for heart attack, stroke and premature death, according to a new study. Researchers looked at nearly 140,000 adults who underwent grip-strength tests. The participants were aged 35 to 70, and they were from 17 countries. Their health was followed for an average of four years. Every 11-pound decrease in grip strength was associated with a 16 percent increased risk of death from any cause, the investigators found. Each decrease was also tied to a 17 percent raised risk of heart-related death or death from non-heart causes. And, every 11-pound drop in grip strength was also associated with a 9 percent increased risk of stroke and a 7 percent higher risk of heart attack, the findings showed. Although this study found an association between grip strength and the risk ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease

Immune System Genes May Change With the Seasons: Study

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 – When the seasons change, your immune system response may also change, British researchers report. These findings might explain why conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and heart disease are worse in the winter than in the summer, the new study finds. The researchers from the University of Cambridge analyzed genes from more than 16,000 people worldwide, including those from both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. They found that the activity of nearly one-quarter of the genes differed according to the time of the year. Some are more active in winter and some are more active in summer, the research revealed. Seasons also affect our immune cells, and the composition of our blood and fat, according to the study. Findings were published May 12 in the journal Nature Communications. It's been known that there are seasonal variations in a number of conditions, ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Heart Disease, Psychiatric Disorders, Immunosuppression

High-Protein Diet May Be Dangerous for Those at Risk of Heart Disease

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 8, 2015 – A high-protein diet may backfire for people at risk for heart disease – increasing the likelihood of weight gain and early death, a new study suggests. Replacing carbohydrates and fats with protein is touted as a quick way to weight loss. But this long-term Spanish study of older adults found these high-protein diets – think Atkins and South Beach, for example – may be harmful. When protein replaced carbohydrates, for instance, the eating plan was linked to a 90 percent greater risk of gaining more than 10 percent of body weight. It was also linked to a 59 percent higher risk of death from any cause, the researchers found. When protein replaced fat, risk of death rose 66 percent, the researchers said. "These results do not support the generalized use of high-protein diets as a good strategy for losing weight," said lead researcher Monica Bullo, of Pere Virgili ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Heart Attack, Renal Failure, Dietary Supplementation, Chronic Kidney Disease, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Many Aging Boomers Face Chronic Illness, But Death Rate Is Falling: CDC

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 6, 2015 – A new study finds mixed results for the health of America's aging "Baby Boom" generation, with nearly half of people ages 55 to 64 taking a prescription heart drug and about 1 in 5 dealing with diabetes. However, the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also finds that the overall death rate in this age group has gone down over the past decade. The report shows that the "prevalence of diabetes and obesity among Baby Boomers remains remarkably high and is a public health concern," said Dr. Ronald Tamler, who directs the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute in New York City. But he said the new findings also show that "interventions focusing on heart health are beginning to pay off." The new data comes from an annual report from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, looking at 2014 statistics on the health of all ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Angina, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Hypertriglyceridemia, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hyperlipoproteinemia, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Little Risk of Vitamin D Toxicity, Study Says

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 6, 2015 – The risk for developing vitamin D toxicity is rare, researchers have found. With vitamin D supplementation on the rise, investigators set out to assess the odds of developing dangerously high blood calcium levels. "The evidence is clear that vitamin D toxicity is one of the rarest medical conditions and is typically due to intentional or inadvertent intake of extremely high doses," Dr. Michael Holick wrote in an editorial in the May issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Holick, of Boston University School of Medicine, was not involved in the study. Vitamin D is often recommended to improve or protect bone health, and there are indications it may also help prevent cancer, diabetes, and/or heart disease, the researchers noted. Apart from supplements, natural sources of vitamin D include oily fish (mackerel and salmon), fortified milk, and sunlight. The upper ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Heart Disease, Osteoporosis, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Fracture, bone, Caltrate 600 with D, Hypercalcemia, Os-Cal 500 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Oyster Shell Calcium, Citracal + D, Oysco 500 with D, Calcarb with D, Calcium 600 D, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Dicalphos plus D, Caltro with Vitamin D, Oysco D with Calcium

Health Tip: Living With Diabetes and Heart Disease

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

-- As if living with diabetes or heart disease weren't enough, some people face life with both conditions. To help people deal with this double whammy, the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute suggests: Speak openly with your health care team about all of your emotions. Stressed out? Work with a therapist to help you cope. Join a support group for people living with diabetic heart disease. Share your feelings with friends and family members. When you need it, request help from loved ones. Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

U.S. Hispanics Face Unique Health Challenges, CDC Says

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 5, 2015 – Hispanics in the United States carry very different health risks than whites and face a tougher time getting needed medical care, according to a new federal report. Similar to whites, the two leading causes of death among Hispanics are heart disease and cancer, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found in its first national study of Hispanic health issues. But Hispanics are much more likely than whites to die from diabetes, homicide, or chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, the CDC researchers found. They also are more likely to be obese. The good news is that Hispanics have an overall 24 percent lower death rate than whites, as well as lower death rates for nine of the 15 leading causes of death. These include cancer, heart disease, injuries, stroke, respiratory disease, Alzheimer's disease and suicide. This phenomenon is known as the "Hispanic ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Heart Disease, Cirrhosis, Liver Cirrhosis, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Bystander CPR Linked to Better Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 – New research from Denmark finds that more cardiac arrest survivors are returning to work, because more bystanders are performing CPR. "We already know CPR helps save lives – and now our findings suggest there is even more benefit in performing it," study author Dr. Kristian Kragholm, a clinical assistant at Aalborg University Hospital and Aarhus University in Aalborg, said in an American Heart Association (AHA) news release. He is also a fellow at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, N.C. For the new study, researchers tracked over 4,300 people in Denmark who had jobs prior to experiencing cardiac arrest between 2001 and 2011. The study only included people who were not in a hospital at the time of their cardiac arrest. More than 75 percent of the survivors were capable of returning to work, and their chances of doing so were about 40 percent higher in ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Minoxidil, Nitroglycerin, Myocardial Infarction, Hydralazine, Caverject, Muse, Alprostadil, Edex, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Nitrostat, Nitro-Bid, Nitro-Dur, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Caverject Impulse, NitroQuick, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Nitrolingual Pumpspray

Routine Heart Care Similar From Nurse Practitioners, Doctors: Study

Posted 1 May 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 1, 2015, – Many patients with chronic heart disease will receive the same quality of care from a nurse practitioner or physician assistant as they would from a doctor, a new study suggests. That's good news because the recent expansion of U.S. health coverage has many public health experts warning of a future with too few doctors for the patients on hand. "With the passage of the Affordable Care Act, we are looking at 34 million new patients entering the system with new coverage by 2016," said study lead author Dr. Salim Virani, an investigator with the Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Houston. "The estimates are that by 2020 we will have a shortfall of 45,000 primary care doctors and 45,000 specialists, rising to 130,000 doctors by 2025." This begs the question, he said, as to how the short-handed health care system will handle this influx of patients. Shortages of ... Read more

Related support groups: Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Angina, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol, Myocardial Infarction, Nadolol, Labetalol, Tenormin, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)

2-Minute Walk Every Hour May Help Offset Effects of Sitting

Posted 30 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 30, 2015 – Getting up and walking for two minutes every hour could help reverse the negative health effects from prolonged sitting, new research suggests. Previous studies have shown that sitting for extended periods of time every day can increase the risk of a number of health issues, such as heart disease, diabetes and premature death. Current exercise recommendations advise adults to get at least 2.5 hours of moderate physical activity each week. But 80 percent of Americans don't meet this goal. The new findings – if confirmed – suggest that even small periods of light activity offer health benefits. "Exercise is great, but the reality is that the practical amount of vigorous exercise that can be achieved is limited. Our study suggests that even small changes can have a big impact," said senior study author Tom Greene. He is director of the Study Design and ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Diabetes Mellitus, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Asystole

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