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Common Gout Drug Tied to Lower Risk of Early Death in Study

Posted 28 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 28, 2014 – A drug often used to treat gout may reduce the risk of premature death in patients with this common form of arthritis, according to a new study. Previous research has associated gout with an increased risk of early death. This study examined how allopurinol – the most widely used medication for gout – might affect that risk. Allopurinol causes a potentially fatal reaction in about one of 260 patients who uses the drug, which has made some doctors reluctant to prescribe it, according to background information in the study. The researchers looked at data from over 5,900 gout patients in the United Kingdom who were prescribed allopurinol and compared them to a group of gout patients who did not take the drug. Patients who took allopurinol were 11 percent less likely to die from all causes during the study period than those who did not take the medication. ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Allopurinol, Zyloprim, Gouty Arthritis, Lopurin, Aloprim

CT Scans Might Help Diagnose Gout in Some Cases

Posted 26 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 26, 2014 – CT scans can help detect gout that's been missed by the current standard testing method, a new study suggests. Gout is a common and painful form of arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid in the body. The standard test – called needle aspiration – involves taking fluid or tissue samples from a gout-affected joint and checking them for uric acid crystals. This test usually detects gout in patients, but not always. In this study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that dual energy CT scans detected gout in one-third of patients who had negative results on the needle aspiration test. The CT scans were particularly effective in patients who'd had several gout-like episodes but had remained undiagnosed. After CT scans pinpointed what appeared to be uric acid crystals, ultrasound-guided needle aspiration was used to collect samples from those areas, according to ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Diagnosis and Investigation

Health Tip: Know Risk Factors for Gout

Posted 7 Aug 2013 by Drugs.com

-- Gout is characterized by a buildup of uric acid in the body, leading to swollen, painful joints. The U.S. National Institute on Aging mentions these common risk factors for gout: Being male. Having a family history of gout. Being overweight. Eating a poor diet. Drinking alcohol. Having too much uric acid in the blood, a condition called hyperuricemia. Read more

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Will New Gout Findings Get a Toehold?

Posted 12 Jun 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 12 – The big toe is not the biggest culprit in gout flare-ups, contrary to popular belief, a new study reports. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., found that people with the highest risk of repeated cases of gout are those whose gout first appears in other joints, such as the knee or elbow, rather than in the joints of the big toe. Gout is a painful form of arthritis caused by uric acid buildup in the body. Continuing to take medication is essential to prevent recurrences, the researchers said. "Because patients often think that a gout flare-up means their medications are not working, they may stop medications like allopurinol. It is especially important for these patients to continue taking gout medication to prevent flare-ups," study co-author Dr. Eric Matteson, rheumatology chair, said in a Mayo news release. The study was scheduled for ... Read more

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Scientists ID New Genetic Connection for Gout

Posted 28 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 28 – To help explain why the debilitating arthritic condition known as gout strikes some people and not others, a new genetic analysis has identified 18 new mutations that appear to boost blood levels of uric acid, the key trigger for a gout attack. The current effort involved an analysis of data concerning more than 140,000 people, gleaned from 70 independent studies conducted in Europe, the United States, Japan and Australia. "Abnormal levels of uric acid have been associated with various common diseases and conditions, but causal relationships are not always clear," said study author Dr. Veronique Vitart of the Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit at the University of Edinburgh, in Scotland, in a school news release. "Gaining insight into the genetic components of uric acid levels offers a very useful tool to tackle these issues and to further our understanding ... Read more

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Gout Management Is Focus of New Guidelines

Posted 2 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 – Educating gout patients on diet, lifestyle choices and treatment objectives is among the recommendations in new guidelines to help patients and doctors fight the painful disease. Gout, which affects nearly 4 percent of American adults, is one of the most common forms of inflammatory arthritis. Acute gout attacks can be debilitating and reduce patients' quality of life. Diagnosed cases of gout in the United States have risen over the past 20 years and now affect 8.3 million people. The American College of Rheumatology funded a collaborative effort among U.S. researchers to develop the new guidelines that educate patients in effective methods to prevent gout attacks and provide doctors with recommended treatments for long-term management of the disease. Gout is caused by elevated levels of uric acid, which lead to the formation of crystals that are deposited in joints, ... Read more

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Gout Flare-ups Rise Sharply With Certain Foods: Study

Posted 31 May 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 31 – Meat, seafood and other foods rich in compounds called purines are associated with a fivefold increased risk of immediate gout flare-ups, a new study shows. Gout is a form of arthritis that often first occurs in the big toe. Anecdotal evidence has suggested that purine-rich foods can trigger gout attacks, but it hasn't been clear whether they cause immediate attacks. The study included more than 600 patients with gout, most of whom were men and who had an average age of 54. The patients were followed for a year. During that time, the patients had a total of nearly 1,250 gout attacks, most of which occurred in the toe joints, said Dr. Yuqing Zhang and colleagues at the Boston University School of Medicine. The average amount of dietary purines consumed during a two-day period without gout attacks was 1.66 grams, compared with 2.03 grams in the two days before an ... Read more

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Enriched Skim Milk Good for Gout, Study Suggests

Posted 24 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24 – If you have gout, drinking enriched skim milk may help reduce the frequency of painful flare-ups, new research suggests. The new study included 120 patients who had experienced at least two flare-ups in the previous four months. They were divided into three treatment groups that consumed either lactose powder, skim milk powder or skim milk powder enriched with glycomacropeptide (GMP) and G600 milk fat extract (G600). Gout, a common form of arthritis, is caused by uric acid buildup in blood. Often, the big toe is the first place where gout strikes. Previous research has shown a higher risk for gout among people who consume fewer dairy products, and earlier work suggested that GMP and G600 tone down the inflammatory response to gout crystals. The powders were mixed in roughly 8 ounces of water as a vanilla-flavored shake and consumed once a day. The patients recorded ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Gout - Acute, Gouty Arthritis, Gout - Prophylaxis, Pseudogout, Pseudogout - Prophylaxis

Medication For Severe, Chronic Gout Associated With Improvement in Symptoms

Posted 17 Aug 2011 by Drugs.com

CHICAGO, Aug. 16, 2011—As an alternative to a conventional treatment for gout that some patients may not respond to, patients with severe, chronic gout who received the medication pegloticase for 6 months had greater improvement in measures of uric acid levels as well as physical function and quality of life, according to a study in the August 17 issue of JAMA. Long-term urate (a salt derived from uric acid) lowering therapy in gout aims to maintain concentrations of uric acid (UA) below a certain level. However, it is common for UA levels to exceed a recommended goal urate range during oral urate-lowering therapy among the 5 to 6 million U.S. patients with gout, according to background information in the article. Although available oral urate-lowering agents can achieve target UA in most patients, urate-lowering therapy fails for perhaps 3 percent of patients because of refractoriness ( ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Krystexxa, Peglase

New Drug May Relieve Severe, Tough-to-Treat Gout

Posted 16 Aug 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 16 – For some gout patients afflicted with a particularly severe, crippling form of the disease who find standard treatments either intolerable or ineffective, a recently approved alternative appears to afford relief. A new injectable treatment called pegloticase (brand name Krystexxa) has no effect on most severe gout patients, but researchers say that for the roughly four in 10 patients who do respond positively, the improvement can be significant. Use of pegloticase was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in September 2010. However, the treatment is expensive and the study found a high rate of side effects, some extremely serious, suggesting that health providers have to weigh the costs and benefits on a case by case basis. "What we're focusing on here are the approximately 3 percent of gout patients who have the most advanced form of disease," said study ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Krystexxa, Peglase

Painful Gout Afflicting More Americans: Study

Posted 28 Jul 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 28 – Over the past two decades, the number of American adults with the painful joint disease gout has soared to 8.3 million, a new study finds. The study's authors blame the rise in gout – an inflammatory form of arthritis triggered by a buildup of uric acid in the joints – on rising rates of obesity and high blood pressure. They note that better prevention of these risk factors might help reduce the number of people developing the painful condition. Gout now affects 4 percent of adults in the United States, according to the study. Hyperuricemia – a "pre-gout" condition associated with high levels of uric acid in the blood – affects 43.3 million U.S. adults, or 21 percent of the population, the researchers said. Researchers analyzed U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data on nearly 6,000 adults from 2007 and 2008, and compared it to data from 1988 ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Gout - Acute, Gouty Arthritis, Gout - Prophylaxis

New Survey Reveals Most Americans Unaware of Gout Risk Factors, in the Dark About Connection to Diabetes, Kidney Disease, and Cardiac Problems

Posted 19 May 2011 by Drugs.com

Gout & Uric Acid Education Society Survey Further Reveals Gout Sufferers Only Slightly More Aware of Risk Factors Than General Population May 22 is Gout Awareness Day CLEVELAND, May 17, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — A new survey from the nonprofit Gout & Uric Acid Education Society (GUAES) highlights an alarming awareness gap among Americans regarding the risk factors for gout, a chronic, potentially disabling form of arthritis which now affects an estimated 8.3 million Americans¹. Among the survey findings are that only one in 10 Americans correctly cited cardiovascular disease as a risk factor for gout, while only one in three Americans correctly reported that obesity is a risk factor, and less than one in five reported that diabetes and kidney disease are risk factors. GUAES released the survey findings in advance of its annual Gout Awareness Day on May 22. Gout is a form of arthritis caused by ... Read more

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Women Who Drink Sugary Beverages Raise Risk of Gout

Posted 10 Nov 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 10 – Women who drink fructose-rich beverages such as sugar-sweetened sodas and orange juice are at increased risk for gout, a new study finds. The incidence of gout – a painful type of inflammatory arthritis – in the United States increased from 16 per 100,000 people in 1977 to 42 per 100,000 in 1996. That rise coincided with a large increase in soda and fructose consumption, the study authors noted. Fructose-rich beverages can cause a buildup of uric acid in the blood, which leads to gout. In this study, researchers analyzed data from 78,906 women who took part in the Nurses' Health Study between 1984 and 2006. The women had no history of gout at the start of the study. Over the next 22 years, 778 of the women were diagnosed with gout. Compared with women who consumed less than one serving of sugar-sweetened soda per month, those who consumed one serving per day were ... Read more

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Painful Gout on the Rise in U.S.

Posted 7 Nov 2010 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 7 – More and more Americans are struggling with gout as rates of the painful and sometimes disabling arthritic condition continue a decades-long upswing, a new study shows. Researchers report that by 2008, an estimated 8.3 million Americans were subject to gout attacks, equivalent to 3.9 percent of the U.S. adult population. That's a substantial rise from the 2.7 percent prevalence rate noted in the late 1980s to early 1990s. The findings are to be presented this week in Atlanta at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology. Other research presented at the meeting suggests that two of America's favorite beverages, coffee and sweetened drinks such as sodas, may contribute to gout risk. Gout is a very painful form of arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid. This causes uric acid crystals to be deposited on the cartilage of joints, tendons and other ... Read more

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FDA Approves Krystexxa (pegloticase) for Gout

Posted 16 Sep 2010 by Drugs.com

ROCKVILLE, Md., Sept. 14, 2010--The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Krystexxa (pegloticase) to treat the painful condition known as gout in adults who do not respond to or who cannot tolerate conventional therapy. Gout occurs due to an excess of the bodily waste uric acid, which is eventually deposited as needle-like crystals in the joints or in soft tissue.  These crystals can cause intermittent swelling, redness, heat, pain and stiffness in the joints. Gout is strongly associated with obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, and occurs more often in men, in women after menopause, and in people with kidney disease. “About 3 percent of the three million adults who suffer from gout are not helped by conventional therapy. This new drug offers an important new option for them,” said Badrul Chowdhury, M.D., director of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, ... Read more

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Gout - Acute, Gouty Arthritis, Gout - Prophylaxis, Pseudogout

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