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Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – Although overall colon cancer rates are declining, the rates among Americans under 50 have jumped more than 11 percent in the past decade, a new study finds. Over the same decade, the number of cancers in those 50 and older fell by nearly 3 percent, the study found. "Our findings suggest that health care providers should be more vigilant about detecting symptoms in younger patients and also should consider lowering the threshold for colonoscopy screening," lead researcher Dr. Elie Sutton said during a media briefing. Sutton is a research fellow at Mount Sinai West Hospital in New York City. "We really don't know why colon cancer is increasing in younger patients," he said. "We can speculate that it's due to increases in inflammatory bowel disease or a change in diet, but really there is no clear consensus on that." The researchers also found that colon cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Dietary Supplementation, Colorectal Cancer, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Dietary Fiber Supplementation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

A Little Excess Weight May Boost Colon Cancer Survival

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 – In what may come as a bit of a surprise, a new study found that overweight colon cancer patients tended to have better survival than their normal-weight peers. "Overweight and obesity have been identified as risk factors for many health conditions, but for people with colorectal cancer, some extra weight may provide protection against mortality," said study lead author Candyce Kroenke. She's a research scientist at Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, Calif. Still, one health expert cautioned that the finding is no license for people to pile on excess pounds. "This study should not be used to describe an 'upside' of being overweight with regard to cancer risk, since overweight people develop cancer at higher rates," said gastroenterologist Dr. Arun Swaminath of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. In the study, Kroenke's team examined the medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Tumor Location Affects Colon Cancer Survival: Study

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Your survival odds against colon cancer may depend on which side of your colon the tumor develops, new research contends. In a study of more than 1,000 men and women with colon cancer that had spread, those whose tumor was on the left side survived just over 33 months, while those whose tumor was on the right side survived only slightly more than 19 months. "It's a stunning and surprising finding, and the difference is dramatic," said lead researcher Dr. Alan Venook, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. It appears that colon cancer that begins on the right side is different from colon cancer that begins on the left side, he said. "We thought of the colon as a tube that propelled stool out of the body, but it's not that simple," Venook said. "Each side of the colon starts in a different place, which is why the cancers are ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Avastin, Erbitux, Bevacizumab, Cetuximab, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Small Study Supports New Stool-Based Colon Cancer Test

Posted 19 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 – A new, but small, study finds more evidence that a recently approved, stool-based colon cancer test may be effective for certain patients. Still, experts who looked at the findings stressed that the test, called Cologuard, should never be used as a substitute for the "gold standard" colon cancer test, colonoscopy. Cologuard is a noninvasive stool DNA test that detects red blood cells and certain DNA mutations that are associated with colon cancer. The test was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014. The new study included nearly 400 people at average risk for colon cancer, meaning they had no symptoms and no personal or family history of the disease or precancerous polyps. The patients had also not yet undergone more invasive screening procedures, such as colonoscopy. At one year of follow-up, 51 of the patients (about 15 percent) had a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Study Finds Stool Test Effective for Detecting Colon Cancer

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Tests for blood in the stool can consistently detect colon cancer when used on an annual basis, and they are effective even in the second, third and fourth years of screening, a new study says. The researchers said these findings suggest that the stool test could be a reasonable screening alternative to colonoscopy – currently considered the gold standard for colon cancer screening. Known as fecal immunochemical tests, experts examine stool samples for microscopic amounts of blood shed by colon tumors, explained study co-author Dr. Douglas Corley, a research scientist with Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, Calif. Doctors have been concerned that fecal blood tests might become less effective over time, hampering their usefulness as a screening tool, he said. Colon tumors or precancerous polyps have to be large to start releasing blood into a person's stool, Corley ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

More People Under 50 Getting Colon Cancer, Analysis Finds

Posted 25 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Colon cancer rates are rising among men and women under 50, the age at which guidelines recommend screenings start, a new analysis shows. One in seven colon cancer patients is under 50. Younger patients are more likely to have advanced stage cancer, but they live slightly longer without a cancer recurrence because they are treated aggressively, the researchers reported. "Colon cancer has traditionally been thought of as a disease of the elderly," said study lead author Dr. Samantha Hendren, an associate professor of surgery at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. "This study is really a wake-up call to the medical community that a relatively large number of colon cancers are occurring in people under 50," she added. However, Hendren said it's too soon to say whether colon cancer screening guidelines should be altered to reflect that trend. In the analysis, ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Hemorrhoids, Colorectal Cancer, Anal Fissure and Fistula, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Body Imaging

Vitamin D, Calcium May Not Prevent Colon Cancer After All

Posted 14 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 – New clinical trial results negate the supposed colon cancer-preventing benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplements. Neither calcium nor vitamin D, taken alone or together after precancerous colon polyps were removed, significantly reduced the risk of new polyps developing, researchers report. The results contradict decades of observational studies that showed that people who take lots of calcium and vitamin D are less likely to develop colon cancer, researchers said in the Oct. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "It suggests that you should not think you should take calcium or vitamin D to reduce your risk of colon cancer," said study co-author Elizabeth Barry, an assistant professor of epidemiology and community and family medicine at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine in New Hampshire. However, Barry added that this trial focused on a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Caltrate 600 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Os-Cal 500 with D, Oysco 500 with D, Citracal + D, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Calcium 600 D, Calcarb with D, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Oyster Shell Calcium, Risacal-D, Os-Cal 500 + D, Oystercal-D, Citracal Maximum, B-Nexa, Os-Cal with D, Sedecal D

1 in 3 Colon Cancers in Young People Has Genetic Link

Posted 24 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 – More than a third of colon cancers diagnosed in younger patients are caused by inherited gene mutations, a new study finds. These patients should undergo genetic counseling to determine if their families may be at increased risk, the researchers suggested. Hereditary colon cancers are relatively rare overall, but tend to be more common if diagnosed before age 50, the researchers said. However, their prevalence among teens and young adults has not been well documented, according to the researchers. This study included almost 200 patients, aged 35 and younger, who were diagnosed with colon cancer and underwent genetic testing between 2009 and 2013. "We were very surprised to find that 35 percent of that population of patients had a genetic disease, although we hypothesized the proportion would be higher in this age group relative to the general population," study ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

U.S. Oncologists Decry High Cost of Cancer Drugs

Posted 23 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 – Soaring costs for cancer drugs are hurting patient care in the United States, a group of top oncologists claim. "High cancer-drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," Dr. Ayalew Tefferi, a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a Mayo news release. Tefferi and his colleagues made a number of recommendations on how to address the problem in a commentary published July 23 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices is one of the suggestions the team of 118 leading cancer experts offered as a possible solution. Along with their recommendations, the group also expressed support for a patient-based grassroots movement on change.org that is demanding action on the issue. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Accutane, Lupron, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Tretinoin, Femara, Fluorouracil, Gleevec, Colorectal Cancer, Lung Cancer, Rituxan, Renal Cell Carcinoma

The Doctor Who Does Your Colonoscopy Matters

Posted 16 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 16, 2015 – The doctor performing your colonoscopy makes a difference in whether you'll develop colon cancer or die from it, a new study finds. Colonoscopy saves lives, and "high quality" colonoscopies save even more, the study authors said. High quality means screening by doctors adept at identifying many precancerous growths (polyps), they said. "The results further suggest that efforts to improve the detection and removal of precancerous polyps will likely not only help patients, but will support current efforts to improve the quality of the test and be cost-effective," said study lead author Reinier Meester, of Erasmus MC University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. In the study, higher-quality colonoscopies were associated with a 50 to 60 percent lower risk for colon cancer and colon cancer fatalities over a patient's lifetime. Higher-quality screenings ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

New Colon Polyp Removal Method May Be Easier on Patients

Posted 6 May 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 5, 2014 – A team-based procedure for removing difficult or large precancerous colon polyps is effective and eliminates the need to take out part of a person's colon to reduce their cancer risk, a small clinical trial shows. In the procedure, a surgeon manipulates the colon from outside the organ so that a second doctor can get to the hard-to-reach polyp and remove it from inside the colon via colonoscopy. This team procedure, called "laparoscopic-assisted colonoscopy with polypectomy," eliminates the need for a surgeon to remove the entire section of the colon that contains the polyp, a procedure called "laparoscopic hemicolectomy." A clinical trial comparing the new and old procedures found that laparoscopic-assisted colonoscopy is as safe and effective as surgery to remove part of the colon, but results in shorter hospital stays and less harm done to patients, said lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Too Much Sitting Tied to Higher Risk of Colon Polyps in Men

Posted 28 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 28 – Men who are more sedentary face a higher risk of recurring colon polyps, according to a new study, even if these men break up their downtime with bouts of recreational activities such as walking, jogging or golf. This suggests that extended inactivity is itself a risk factor for noncancerous colon polyps, benign tumors that can give rise to colorectal cancer, the researchers said. Known as "colorectal adenomas," these polyps typically can be removed after being identified during a colorectal cancer screening, such as a colonoscopy. The recurrence of such polyps, however, seems to be greater among men (but not women) who are relatively less active. The researchers looked at activity levels among more than 1,700 men and women, and found that the more leisurely the men's lifestyle, the greater their risk for precancerous polyps. Men who spent 11 or more hours a day in ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Calcium May Cut Risk for Precancerous Colon Lesions in Some People

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – Consuming higher amounts of calcium may lower the likelihood of precancerous colon and rectal lesions in people who are at increased risk due to variations in two genes, a new study suggests. High calcium intake did not affect risk in people without the genetic variations. The findings may help explain inconsistent results in previous research about the link between calcium intake and the risk for these lesions, called colorectal adenomas, the researchers said. They also said the findings may help identify patients who would benefit from calcium supplements or higher levels of calcium in their diet. The study of nearly 6,000 people in Tennessee found that patients with the highest calcium intake had no reduced risk for colorectal adenomas if they had no variations in two genes – KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 – that are essential in calcium reabsorption in the kidneys. ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Tums, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Arthritis Pain Formula, Pepcid Complete, Rolaids, PhosLo, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Calcium Acetate, Titralac Plus, Calcium Gluconate, Os-Cal, Calcium Chloride, Os-Cal 500, Domeboro

Patients Prefer More Invasive Form of Colon Scan: Study

Posted 22 May 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 22 – Patients undergoing colonoscopies frequently complain about having the procedure, which involves threading a camera through the colon to detect precancerous or cancerous growths. But a new study has found that patients overwhelmingly preferred colonoscopy to the less invasive and less time-consuming CT-based colon scan. Colonoscopy has long been the standard of care for colon cancer screening. Computed tomography (CT) colonography – sometimes called "virtual colonoscopy" – is a newer technology and involves simply scanning the abdomen to look for abnormalities. Colon cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world but can largely be prevented with adequate screening. For this study, 90 patients at average risk for colon cancer underwent CT colonography followed by a colonoscopy within the following two hours. They then answered 13 questions regarding their ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Computed Tomography

Colonoscopy May Detect Curable Cancer in Elderly: Study

Posted 22 May 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 22 – Colonoscopies helped doctors detect a high rate of curable cancer in elderly people who had the screening for the first time, a new study indicates. The findings suggest that screenings should be made available to otherwise healthy elderly people who have never been tested, Dr. Therese Kerwel, research fellow at Grand Rapids Medical Education Partners, and colleagues from Spectrum Health Medical Group in Grand Rapids, Mich., concluded. For the study, the investigators examined information on 903 outpatient colonoscopies among elderly patients. Specifically, they investigated why these people, aged 76 to 85, underwent a colonoscopy and analyzed the results of the screenings. The study revealed that patients who had never had a colonoscopy before had a cancer rate of 9.4 percent, much higher than those who had had the procedure before. The findings are scheduled for ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

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