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Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Blog

New Colon Polyp Removal Method May Be Easier on Patients

Posted 6 May 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 5, 2014 – A team-based procedure for removing difficult or large precancerous colon polyps is effective and eliminates the need to take out part of a person's colon to reduce their cancer risk, a small clinical trial shows. In the procedure, a surgeon manipulates the colon from outside the organ so that a second doctor can get to the hard-to-reach polyp and remove it from inside the colon via colonoscopy. This team procedure, called "laparoscopic-assisted colonoscopy with polypectomy," eliminates the need for a surgeon to remove the entire section of the colon that contains the polyp, a procedure called "laparoscopic hemicolectomy." A clinical trial comparing the new and old procedures found that laparoscopic-assisted colonoscopy is as safe and effective as surgery to remove part of the colon, but results in shorter hospital stays and less harm done to patients, said lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Too Much Sitting Tied to Higher Risk of Colon Polyps in Men

Posted 28 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 28 – Men who are more sedentary face a higher risk of recurring colon polyps, according to a new study, even if these men break up their downtime with bouts of recreational activities such as walking, jogging or golf. This suggests that extended inactivity is itself a risk factor for noncancerous colon polyps, benign tumors that can give rise to colorectal cancer, the researchers said. Known as "colorectal adenomas," these polyps typically can be removed after being identified during a colorectal cancer screening, such as a colonoscopy. The recurrence of such polyps, however, seems to be greater among men (but not women) who are relatively less active. The researchers looked at activity levels among more than 1,700 men and women, and found that the more leisurely the men's lifestyle, the greater their risk for precancerous polyps. Men who spent 11 or more hours a day in ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Calcium May Cut Risk for Precancerous Colon Lesions in Some People

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – Consuming higher amounts of calcium may lower the likelihood of precancerous colon and rectal lesions in people who are at increased risk due to variations in two genes, a new study suggests. High calcium intake did not affect risk in people without the genetic variations. The findings may help explain inconsistent results in previous research about the link between calcium intake and the risk for these lesions, called colorectal adenomas, the researchers said. They also said the findings may help identify patients who would benefit from calcium supplements or higher levels of calcium in their diet. The study of nearly 6,000 people in Tennessee found that patients with the highest calcium intake had no reduced risk for colorectal adenomas if they had no variations in two genes – KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 – that are essential in calcium reabsorption in the kidneys. ... Read more

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Patients Prefer More Invasive Form of Colon Scan: Study

Posted 22 May 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 22 – Patients undergoing colonoscopies frequently complain about having the procedure, which involves threading a camera through the colon to detect precancerous or cancerous growths. But a new study has found that patients overwhelmingly preferred colonoscopy to the less invasive and less time-consuming CT-based colon scan. Colonoscopy has long been the standard of care for colon cancer screening. Computed tomography (CT) colonography – sometimes called "virtual colonoscopy" – is a newer technology and involves simply scanning the abdomen to look for abnormalities. Colon cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world but can largely be prevented with adequate screening. For this study, 90 patients at average risk for colon cancer underwent CT colonography followed by a colonoscopy within the following two hours. They then answered 13 questions regarding their ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Computed Tomography

Colonoscopy May Detect Curable Cancer in Elderly: Study

Posted 22 May 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 22 – Colonoscopies helped doctors detect a high rate of curable cancer in elderly people who had the screening for the first time, a new study indicates. The findings suggest that screenings should be made available to otherwise healthy elderly people who have never been tested, Dr. Therese Kerwel, research fellow at Grand Rapids Medical Education Partners, and colleagues from Spectrum Health Medical Group in Grand Rapids, Mich., concluded. For the study, the investigators examined information on 903 outpatient colonoscopies among elderly patients. Specifically, they investigated why these people, aged 76 to 85, underwent a colonoscopy and analyzed the results of the screenings. The study revealed that patients who had never had a colonoscopy before had a cancer rate of 9.4 percent, much higher than those who had had the procedure before. The findings are scheduled for ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Middle-Aged Diabetics May Need Earlier Colon Checks

Posted 22 May 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 22 – Researchers who say they've linked type 2 diabetes with earlier development of precancerous colon lesions recommend people with the blood sugar disorder start colorectal screenings at a younger age than others. "Based on our data, it implies that people with diabetes should get screenings earlier, possibly at age 40, rather than at age 50," said Dr. Hongha Vu, a clinical gastroenterology fellow at Washington University in St. Louis. However, another expert said more research is needed before making that recommendation. Also, the researchers cautioned that they can't say for sure that diabetes by itself raises the risk of the precancerous lesions and further study is required. Experts know that diabetes is linked with an increased risk of colon and other cancers. Vu's team set out to determine if people with diabetes develop precancerous lesions, also called polyps or ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Blacks, Hispanics Have Higher Colon Polyp Risk Than Previously Thought

Posted 15 May 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 15 – Black and Hispanic Americans are far more likely than whites to develop precancerous colorectal polyps, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from more than 5,000 men and women aged 50 and older who had a first-time colonoscopy screening at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center in New York City between 2006 and 2010. None of the patients had signs or symptoms of colorectal (colon) cancer at the time of the screening. At least one precancerous polyp was detected in 26 percent of blacks, 22 percent of Hispanics and 19 percent of whites. The findings run counter to current statistics showing that Hispanics have a lower rate of colon cancer than whites, and adds to recent evidence that the rate of colorectal cancer among Hispanics may be increasing as they adopt more mainstream American lifestyle habits, the researchers said. The study ... Read more

Related support groups: Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Eating Fish May Help Ward Off Colon Polyps in Women

Posted 17 Feb 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 – Eating at least three servings of fish a week may reduce women's risk of developing some types of colon polyps, according to a new study. Colon polyps are small growths on the intestinal lining that may develop into cancer. Previous research has suggested a link between inflammation and formation of colon polyps. Omega-3 fats in fish may reduce inflammation and help protect against the development of colon polyps, according to the researchers at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville, Tenn.. Their study of more than 5,300 people found that women who ate at least three servings of fish a week were 33 percent less likely to develop colon polyps, and also had lower levels of an inflammation-related hormone called prostaglandin E2. "That was the aspect of the study we were particularly excited about because prostaglandin E2 is known to be associated with ... Read more

Related support groups: Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Cancer Patients Should Ask Doctors to Use Simple Terms

Posted 28 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 – Cancer patients are often faced with many difficult-to-understand treatment choices that can have serious side effects and even mean the difference between life and death. That's why it's crucial that patients insist doctors use plain language in explaining the options, advised Angela Fagerlin, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and a researcher at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. "People are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they're getting themselves into. Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo," Fagerlin said in a university news release. She and her colleagues outlined a number of tips to help patients get the information they need ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Methotrexate, Depo-Provera, Breast Cancer, Lupron, Accutane, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Gleevec, Fluorouracil, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Rituxan, Tretinoin, Claravis

High-Fiber Diet Might Lower Risk for Colon Polyps

Posted 9 Aug 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 9 – People who regularly eat legumes, brown rice, cooked green vegetables and dried fruit have a reduced risk of colon polyps, a precursor to colon cancer. That's the finding of California researchers who analyzed data from 2,818 people who were followed for 26 years. During that time, 441 cases of rectal/colon polyps were detected among the participants. The risk of polyps was 40 percent lower among those who ate brown rice at least once a week and 33 percent lower among those who eat legumes (a class of vegetables that includes beans, peas and lentils) at least three times a week, the Loma Linda University team found. Eating dried fruit three times or more a week, compared to less than once a week, was associated with a 26 percent reduced risk. Eating cooked green vegetables once a day or more, vs. less than five times a week, was associated with a 24 percent reduced ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Fewer Cancer Patients May Be Depressed Than Thought

Posted 20 Jan 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 – The rate of depression among cancer patients may be lower than previously believed, a new study indicates. An international team of researchers analyzed 94 studies involving more than 14,000 patients and found that about one-sixth of cancer patients suffer depression and about one-third have a more widely defined mood disorder. Only modest rates of depression and anxiety occurred in cancer patients in the first five years after diagnosis, which suggests that depression is not inevitable in these patients, the researchers said. Only when it was combined with other mood disorders was depression common, occurring in 30 percent of hospitalized cancer patients. The study is published online Jan. 19 in The Lancet Oncology. Rates of depression and anxiety were not significantly different between patients receiving palliative care (care designed to ease pain and increase ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Brain Tumor, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Osteosarcoma, Endometrial Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer

1 in 5 Cancer Survivors Suffers Chronic Pain, Study Finds

Posted 20 Jan 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 – More than 40 percent of cancer survivors experience pain, and the risk is highest among black and female patients, finds a new study. Researchers at the University of Michigan Health System surveyed nearly 200 U.S. cancer survivors and found that 43 percent had experienced pain since their diagnosis, and 20 percent suffered chronic cancer-related pain at least two years later. Among white patients, the most significant source of pain was cancer surgery (53.8 percent), and among black patients the greatest source of pain was cancer treatment (46.2 percent), according to the report. In addition, the study found that compared to men, women had more pain, more pain flare-ups, more disability due to pain and were more depressed because of pain. The authors also noted that black patients were more likely to report greater severity of pain and more pain-related ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Brain Tumor, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Osteosarcoma, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic

Demand for Radiation Therapy Predicted to Exceed Supply

Posted 21 Oct 2010 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 – Over the next decade, the growth in demand for radiation therapy in the United States will be 10 times greater than the increase in new radiation oncologists, a difference that could affect cancer patients' access to treatment, according to a new study. Between 2010 and 2020, the number of patients requiring radiation therapy will increase 22 percent but the number of full-time radiation oncologists entering the workforce will increase just 2 percent, said researchers at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and colleagues. They based their predictions on projections that this year 3,943 radiation oncologists will treat an estimated 470,000 patients in the United States. The large increase in demand for radiation therapy will be partly due to growing numbers of older adults and minorities, groups in which certain types of cancers are more ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Brain Tumor, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Osteosarcoma, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic

Cancer Patients' Secondary Symptoms Need Attention: Study

Posted 11 Oct 2010 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 11 – Many cancer patients with pain or depression also experience physical symptoms, such as fatigue, dry mouth and nausea, that can cause disability, a new study shows. Doctors need to recognize and treat these symptoms in order to improve quality of life for cancer patients, said Dr. Kurt Kroenke, of the Richard Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indiana University, and Regenstrief Institute Inc. in Indianapolis, and colleagues. They analyzed data from 405 cancer patients who had either pain or depression and found that all the patients had at least one of 22 physical symptoms examined in the study. More than half of patients reported 15 of the 22 symptoms. The most common symptoms were fatigue (97.5 percent), difficulty sleeping (about 79 percent), pain in limbs or joints (78 percent), back pain (nearly 75 percent) and memory problems (72 percent). The patients also reported ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Brain Tumor, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Osteosarcoma, Endometrial Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer

Cost-Conscious Cancer Survivors Skip Care

Posted 14 Jun 2010 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 14 – Millions of Americans with a history of cancer, particularly people under age 65, are delaying or skimping on medical care because of worries about the cost of treatment, a new study suggests. The finding raises troubling questions about the long-term survival and quality of life of the 12 million adults in the United States whose lives have been forever changed by a diagnosis of cancer. "I think it's concerning because we recognize that cancer survivors have many medical needs that persist for years after their diagnosis and treatment," said study lead author Kathryn E. Weaver, an assistant professor in the Department of Social Sciences & Health Policy at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. The report was published online June 14 in Cancer, a journal of the American Cancer Society. Cost concerns have posed a threat to cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Brain Tumor, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Osteosarcoma, Endometrial Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer

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