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Use of Long-Acting Birth Control Rises Fivefold in a Decade: CDC

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 – The use of long-acting birth control methods such as IUDs or under-the-skin implants jumped fivefold between 2002 and 2011, according to a new U.S. government report. Among U.S. women aged 15 to 44, the use of these long-term but reversible contraceptives rose from 1.5 percent in 2002 to 7.2 percent in 2011-2013, says the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers from the agency's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) believe that these methods are gaining in popularity because of their proven ability to prevent unintended pregnancies. An easing of concerns about safety may be playing a role, too. IUDs (intrauterine devices) were commonly used by women in the 1970s, until safety issues led to a decline in their use. However, since then, IUDs have improved in quality, experts say. Also, over the past 20 years, ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, TriNessa, Mononessa, Plan B One-Step

IUDs, Contraceptive Implants Work Longer Than Thought, Researchers Report

Posted 5 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 – Hormonal intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive implants appear to prevent pregnancy one year beyond their approved length of use, according to early results from an ongoing study. Researchers are assessing whether these long-acting forms of birth control may be effective up to three years after their approved length of use. Hormonal IUDs are currently approved for five years and contraceptive implants – small rods inserted into the arm – are currently approved for three years. Both types of contraception were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The study, by researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, will eventually enroll a total of 800 women. These preliminary results were from 263 women who used the hormonal IUD Mirena and 237 women who used the contraceptive implants Implanon and Nexplanon. The women ... Read more

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Better Contraceptive Knowledge Can Aid in Safe Use of Acne Drug: Study

Posted 5 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 – Researchers say giving birth control information to women visiting dermatology clinics can help promote the safe use of the drug isotretinoin, an acne medication known to cause birth defects. Isotretinion was originally sold under the brand name Accutane. That particular brand has been discontinued, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, the drug is still available under other brand names, including Absorica, Amnesteem, Claravis, Myorisan, Sotret and Zenatane. The FDA requires women of childbearing age to sign a pledge that they will use two forms of contraception when taking isotretinoin because the medication is known to cause birth defects. The study included 100 female patients from one dermatology clinic. Their average age was about 27, and nearly two-thirds had a college education. Their knowledge about eight methods of birth ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Acne, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, TriNessa, Mononessa

Modern Birth Control Methods Could Avoid 15 Million Unwanted Pregnancies: Report

Posted 4 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 – If more women had access to modern birth control methods and used them correctly, there would be 15 million fewer unwanted pregnancies in low- and middle-income nations each year, a new study suggests. For women in these countries, unwanted pregnancies can have serious consequences, including death, disease, disability and fewer educational and job opportunities, the researchers noted. Also, many unwanted pregnancies end in abortion. Researchers looked at birth control use by women between the ages of 15 and 49, in 35 countries, between 2005 and 2012. Birth control was defined as modern or traditional. Modern methods included condoms, intrauterine devices, oral and injectable contraceptives, implants, sterilization and breast feeding. Traditional methods included withdrawal and trying to time intercourse when women weren't fertile. The risk of unwanted ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, TriNessa, Mononessa, Plan B One-Step

Use of 'the Pill' Tied to Higher Risk for Rare Brain Cancer

Posted 22 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 – The risk for developing a rare form of brain cancer known as glioma appears to go up with long-term use of hormonal contraceptives such as the Pill, new Danish research suggests. Women under 50 with a glioma "were 90 percent more likely to have been using hormonal contraceptives for five years or more, compared with women from the general population with no history of brain tumor," said study leader Dr. David Gaist. However, the Danish study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, and Gaist stressed that the findings "need to be put in context" for women because "glioma is very rare." How rare? Only five out of every 100,000 Danish women between the ages of 15 and 49 develop the condition each year, according to Gaist, a professor of neurology at Odense University Hospital. He said that figure includes women who take contraceptives such as the birth control pill. So, ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, TriNessa, Mononessa, Plan B One-Step

Depo-Provera Linked to Higher HIV Risk, Researchers Find

Posted 9 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 – The injectable birth control Depo-Provera is associated with an increased risk of HIV infection in women, according to a review of research in Africa. Women who receive the so-called "birth control shot" have about 40 percent higher odds of becoming infected with HIV, compared to women using some other form of birth control or no birth control at all, researchers reported. However, the review's authors said that the increased risk does not outweigh the contraceptive benefits of Depo-Provera, particularly in the African nations where these studies took place. Banning Depo-Provera would leave many women in developing countries without immediate access to alternative contraceptive options, which would likely lead to more unintended pregnancies, said lead author Lauren Ralph, an epidemiologist at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health. ... Read more

Related support groups: Provera, Depo-Provera, HIV Infection, Medroxyprogesterone, Depo-Provera Contraceptive, Depo-Sub Q Provera, depo-subQ provera 104, Cycrin, Curretab, Amen

The Pill Remains Most Common Method of Birth Control, U.S. Report Shows

Posted 11 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 11, 2014 – The pill remains one of the most popular methods of birth control for women, along with female sterilization and condoms, a new report shows. Among the two-thirds of women aged 15 to 44 who used birth control between 2011 and 2013, approximately 16 percent used the pill. Female sterilization, where women have their fallopian tubes closed or blocked, was used by 15.5 percent of women, while 9.4 percent used male condoms, according to the report published Dec. 11 by the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). But intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants, both types of long-acting reversible contraceptives, are close on the heels of these other forms of birth control, with 7.2 percent of women using them. "Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives is becoming more popular," said report author Kimberly Daniels, of the NCHS. Their use has nearly ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, TriNessa, Mononessa, Plan B One-Step

Too Few Prostate Cancer Patients Get Bone-Strengthening Meds: Study

Posted 3 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 – Many men on hormone therapy for prostate cancer aren't getting bone-strengthening drugs they may need, new Canadian research contends. Hormone therapy, which suppresses male hormones called androgens, helps stop cancer cells from growing. But one consequence of the treatment is weakening of the bones, which can lead to fractures. To reduce this risk, men can be given oral bisphosphonates, such as Fosamax, or an intravenous treatment once a month or once a year with similar drugs, such as Reclast. "There seems to be a clear mismatch between Canadian guidelines regarding bisphosphonate usage in men undergoing hormone therapy for prostate cancer and actual clinical practice," said lead researcher Dr. Shabbir Alibhai, a senior scientist at the University Health Network in Toronto. While the low rates of bisphosphonate prescriptions may be appropriate for patients ... Read more

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Medicines Are Biggest Culprit in Fatal Allergic Reactions: Study

Posted 10 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 – Although food allergies have garnered a lot of attention lately, a new study reports that medications are actually the biggest cause of sudden deaths related to allergy. Over a little more than a decade, nearly 60 percent of the allergy-related deaths were caused by medications, while less than 7 percent were caused by food allergies, the study found. "Medications can be dangerous," said study researcher Dr. Elina Jerschow, director of the Drug Allergy Center at Montefiore Medical Center and assistant professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in New York City. While research from other countries has reported medications as a major culprit in anaphylaxis-related deaths, Jerschow said, the problem has been less defined in the United States. One reason is that there is no national registry for anaphylaxis deaths, she said. The study was ... Read more

Related support groups: Provera, Amoxicillin, Depo-Provera, Doxycycline, Methotrexate, Penicillin, Clindamycin, Bactrim, Metronidazole, Cephalexin, Azithromycin, Lupron, Cipro, Accutane, Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin, Augmentin, Flagyl, Zithromax, Keflex

Some Birth Control Pills May Up Breast Cancer Risk

Posted 1 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 31, 2014 – Birth control pills containing high doses of estrogen, along with some other formulations, may increase the risk of breast cancer in women under 50, new preliminary research suggests. "There are numerous oral contraceptive formulations," explained lead researcher Elisabeth Beaber, a staff scientist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. "Some of these formulations increase breast cancer risk while other formulations do not raise risk." Overall, birth control pill use within the past year was associated with a 50 percent increased risk of breast cancer risk compared with former use or no use of birth control pills, Beaber found. This study was designed to find a possible link between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk in younger women. But, it wasn't designed to prove that birth control pills definitively cause the increased risk. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, TriNessa, Mononessa, Plan B One-Step

Stroke Prevention for Women: Start Early

Posted 17 Jun 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 17, 2014 – Stroke typically affects women in their later years, but doctors are now beginning to focus on helping them cut their risk earlier in life. This increased attention to risk factors in early adult years was recommended by new guidelines that were released earlier this year by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association. Those guidelines are now being phased into practice by primary care doctors, experts say. For women, that translates to more screening for risk factors during office visits and more interventions to ensure a healthy lifestyle to reduce stroke risk, said Dr. Louise McCullough, director of the Stroke Center at the University of Connecticut in Farmington. McCullough is the co-author of a summary of the guidelines that was published June 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Stroke is a serious interruption or reduction of ... Read more

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Obesity, 'The Pill' May Raise MS Risk, Research Suggests

Posted 27 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 27, 2014 – Obesity and birth control pills may play some role in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS), two new studies suggest. One team of researchers found that people who were obese at age 20 had double the risk of developing MS in their lifetime. The researchers suspect a hormone called leptin, which influences appetite, may be causing inflammation that somehow triggers MS. Meanwhile, a second group of scientists found that women who had taken birth control pills were 35 percent more likely to develop MS, and they suggest the hormones in the pills may have an influence in development of the disease. "These studies are pointing us to potential factors that might contribute to MS," said Timothy Coetzee, chief research officer at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. However, he added that it's too soon to make any changes based on either of these studies. ... Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Obesity, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Multiple Sclerosis, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, TriNessa, Mononessa, Plan B One-Step

Health Tip: When Food and Drugs Interact

Posted 27 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

-- When food and drinks interact with medication, the medication may not work sufficiently or the drug can become too powerful as the body has trouble handling it properly. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics mentions these common examples of food and drug interaction: Grapefruit juice interacts with several drugs and may affect the way the body metabolizes medication. Drugs that may interact with grapefruit juice include: some statins, antihistamines, thyroid medications, blood pressure medications, birth control pills, cough suppressants and medications that block stomach acids. Blood-thinning medications can interact with leafy green vegetables, affecting the blood's clotting ability. Natural black licorice may interact with certain blood pressure medications and blood-thinning medications. Salt substitutes can interact with ACE inhibitors and digoxin. Tyramine (found in foods ... Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Hydrocodone, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Codeine, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Amlodipine, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, Lipitor, Benadryl

'The Pill' Tied to Raised Risk of Glaucoma

Posted 18 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2013 – Taking birth control pills for more than three years may increase a woman's risk of developing the eye disease glaucoma, a new study suggests. The findings are from an investigation involving more than 3,400 women aged 40 and older who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2005 and 2008. "At this point, women who have taken oral contraceptives for three or more years should be screened for glaucoma and followed closely by an ophthalmologist, especially if they have any other existing risk factors," said lead researcher Dr. Shan Lin, professor of clinical ophthalmology at the University of California, San Francisco. Women who took birth control pills for longer than three years were twice as likely to have been diagnosed with glaucoma, according to the study. The findings were presented Monday at the annual meeting of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Yasmin, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Nexplanon, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Lutera, TriNessa, Mononessa, Plan B One-Step

FDA Medwatch Alert: Olympia Pharmacy Sterile Compounded Products: Recall - Concerns About Sterility Assurance

Posted 5 Jun 2013 by Drugs.com

  [Posted 05/30/2013] ISSUE: Lowlite Investments d/b/a Olympia Pharmacy ("Lowlite") notified the public of a voluntary multi-state recall of all sterile drug products compounded by the pharmacy that have not reached the expiration date listed on the product. The recall is being initiated due to concerns associated with prior quality control procedures that impacted sterility assurance. In the event a sterile product is compromised patients are at risk for serious and possible life threatening infections. The recall includes all sterile products that Olympia Pharmacy supplied to patients and offices of licensed medical professionals with a use by date of 09/25/2013 or earlier. Olympia Pharmacy will be notifying customers by phone, fax, or mail to return the products to the pharmacy. BACKGROUND: To date, Lowlite has received no reports of injury or illness associated with the use of the a ... Read more

Related support groups: Provera, Depo-Provera, Subutex, Testosterone, Meloxicam, Estradiol, Butrans, Methylprednisolone, AndroGel, Mobic, Medroxyprogesterone, Estrace, Medrol, Buprenorphine, Testim, Axiron, Reglan, Vivelle, Climara, Atropine

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