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Crohn's Disease - Maintenance News

Health Tip: Get Enough Nutrients

Posted 14 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A nutritious diet is especially important for people with irritable bowel disease (IBD), since they may be at increased risk of malnutrition. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America says possible benefits of a nutritious diet include: Fewer symptoms of IBD. Reduced risk of iron or calcium deficiency. Improved bone health. Healthier body weight. Better regulation of hormone levels in girls and women. Read more

Related support groups: Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Stem Cell Transplants May Not Help Tough-to-Treat Crohn's, Study Says

Posted 15 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 15, 2015 – Stem cell transplants seem no better than conventional therapy for Crohn's disease that hasn't responded to other treatments, a new study finds. The European study also found that for patients who cannot undergo surgery for the condition, stem cell transplants resulted in serious side effects, including infections. "In this group of the most resistant cases of Crohn's disease, stem cell transplant was an effective treatment, but it is not a miracle cure that could be applied to anyone with Crohn's disease, because it only seems to work in a minority of patients and the treatment is challenging and hazardous," said lead researcher Christopher Hawkey. He is a professor of gastroenterology at Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham, England. For the study, Hawkey and colleagues randomly assigned 45 patients with Crohn's disease to transplants with their own stem ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Asacol, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Sulfasalazine, Pentasa, Lialda, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Apriso, Mesalamine, Canasa, Asacol HD, Azulfidine, Delzicol, Sulfazine, Diagnosis and Investigation, Rowasa, Azulfidine EN-tabs, Canasa Pac, Salofalk, FIV-ASA

Ultrasound Might Speed Up Digestive Drug Delivery: Animal Study

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – Ultrasound waves could be used to rapidly deliver drugs to the digestive system, new animal research suggests. This new approach to drug delivery might potentially benefit people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, this new method of drug delivery hasn't yet been tested in humans. "With additional research, our technology could prove invaluable in both clinical and research settings, enabling improved therapies and expansion of research techniques applied to the [gastrointestinal] tract," said co-senior study author Daniel Blankschtein, a professor of chemical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. "[Our study] demonstrates for the first time the active administration of drugs, including biologics, through the GI tract," he said in an MIT news release. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Diagnosis and Investigation

Crohn's Disease Treatments for Kids May Not Get Gut Back to Normal

Posted 14 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 – Current therapies for children with Crohn's disease don't fully restore healthy bacteria and fungi populations in their digestive systems, a new study shows. These findings suggest that treatments don't have to bring bacteria and other microbe levels back to normal levels in the gut to be useful. This knowledge could lead to new approaches for diagnosing and treating inflammatory bowel disease, according to the Oct. 14 study in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. "We show that microbes in the gut respond to treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in a much more complex way than has been previously appreciated," co-principal investigator Gary Wu, from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, said in a journal news release. "The results of our study provide information that could be used to track or predict disease, as well as new diet-based therapeutic ... Read more

Related support groups: Prednisone, Methylprednisolone, Crohn's Disease, Prednisolone, Hydrocortisone, Dexamethasone, Cortisone, Medrol, Triamcinolone, Asacol, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Betamethasone, Sulfasalazine, Pentasa, Budesonide, Lialda, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Decadron, Entocort, Solu-Medrol

Crohn's Disease, Colitis Tied to Anxiety in Study

Posted 4 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 – People with inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, have an increased risk for an anxiety disorder, especially women, a new study suggests. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of disorders that cause chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. "Patients with IBD face substantial chronic physical problems associated with the disease," lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson, a professor from the University of Toronto, said in a university news release. "The additional burden of anxiety disorders makes life much more challenging so this 'double jeopardy' must be addressed." The study authors looked at 269 Canadian adults who had been diagnosed with an inflammatory bowel disease. The researchers found that these patients were two times more likely to have had generalized anxiety disorder at some point in their lives than adults ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Performance Anxiety, Lymphocytic Colitis, Allergic Colitis

Stem Cells, Fecal Transplants Show Promise for Crohn's Disease

Posted 10 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 – Two experimental therapies might help manage the inflammatory bowel disorder Crohn's disease, if this early research pans out. In one study, researchers found that a fecal transplant – stool samples taken from a healthy donor – seemed to send Crohn's symptoms into remission in seven of nine children treated. In another, a separate research team showed that stem cells can have lasting benefits for a serious Crohn's complication called fistula. According to the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation, up to 700,000 Americans have Crohn's – a chronic inflammatory disease that causes abdominal cramps, diarrhea, constipation and rectal bleeding. It arises when the immune system mistakenly attacks the lining of the digestive tract. A number of drugs are available to treat Crohn's, including drugs called biologics, which block certain immune-system proteins. But fecal ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Black Children May Fare Worse With Crohn's Disease

Posted 10 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 – Race may play a role in outcomes for children and teens with Crohn's disease, with black patients faring worse than whites, a new study suggests. "We found racial inequalities exist among children and adolescents with Crohn's disease, likely due to a combination of genetic and environmental differences," Dr. Jennifer Dotson, a gastroenterologist at Nationwide Children's Hospital and principal investigator in the Center for Innovation and Pediatric Practice, said in a hospital news release. Researchers analyzed data from more than 4,000 white and black patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. They were all aged 21 or younger. All had been hospitalized due to the digestive system disease between 2004 and 2012. Black patients were 1.5 times more likely to be readmitted to the hospital and required readmission sooner than white patients, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Scientists Grow, Implant Human Intestinal Tissue in Mice

Posted 20 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Oct. 19, 2014 – New stem cell-based research could improve understanding of intestinal diseases and eventually lead to new treatments, a new study suggests. Scientists used stem cells to grow "organoids" of functioning human intestinal tissue in a lab dish. They then transplanted the organoids into mice, creating a new model for studying intestinal disorders, according to the researchers. "This provides a new way to study the many diseases and conditions that can cause intestinal failure, from genetic disorders appearing at birth to conditions that strike later in life, such as cancer and Crohn's disease," lead investigator Dr. Michael Helmrath, surgical director of the Intestinal Rehabilitation Program at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a center news release. "These studies also advance the longer-term goal of growing tissues that can replace damaged ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Entyvio Approved for Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease

Posted 20 May 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 20, 2014 – Entyvio (vedolizumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with moderate-to-severe forms of two gastrointestinal conditions – ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The approval applies to people for whom standard therapies – such as corticosteroids or tumor necrosis factor-blocking medications – have failed. Ulcerative colitis, affecting about 620,000 Americans, causes inflammation and ulcers in the large intestine. This can lead to abdominal discomfort, bleeding and diarrhea, the FDA said in a news release. Crohn's causes inflammation and irritation of any part of the gastrointestinal tract. More than 500,000 Americans have been diagnosed with Crohn's, the FDA said. The most common side effects of Entyvio include headache, joint pain, nausea and fever. More serious adverse reactions observed during clinical testing ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance

Scientists Now See 200 Genes Linked to Crohn's Disease

Posted 19 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19 – Using a new technique, researchers have pinpointed a large number of additional genes associated with Crohn's disease, bringing the total to 200. The scientists at University College London, in England, created a new method to identify and map the locations of genes associated with complex inherited diseases such as Crohn's. Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel disease, affects about 100 to 150 people out of every 100,000. Understanding more about the genes associated with the disease may lead to improved treatments, the researchers said. The 200 genes so far linked to Crohn's are more than have been found for any other disease, according to the researchers. For example, just 66 gene regions are known for type 2 diabetes. "The discovery of so many gene locations for Crohn's disease is an important step forward in understanding the disease, which has a very ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Mouse Study Suggests Certain Fats Could Trigger Crohn's, Colitis

Posted 13 Jun 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 13 – Certain types of saturated fats common in today's Western diet may change gut bacteria and trigger inflammatory bowel disease in people genetically predisposed to the disorder, according to a new study that looked at this relationship in mice. Inflammatory bowel disease includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The University of Chicago researchers said their findings help explain why once rare immune-system-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease have become more common in the United States and other Westernized nations in the last half-century. The researchers said their study may shed some light on why many people who are genetically prone to the condition still don't develop it and how certain environmental factors can cause inflammation in those at risk. Scientists note, however, that research with animals often fails to provide similar ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance

Chronic Bowel Disease Drugs Linked to Skin Cancer Risk

Posted 23 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 – Some patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be at increased risk for skin cancer due to their use of immunosuppressant drugs to treat the intestinal disorder, according to the results of two new studies. The studies, published in the November issue of the journal Gastroenterology, noted that immunosuppressants are commonly used to treat patients with inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD. Currently, there are no specific recommendations for skin cancer screening in IBD patients. In one study, French researchers led by Dr. Laurent Peyrin-Biroulet, of University Hospital of Nancy, found that both past and present use of a widely used class of immunosuppressants called thiopurines significantly increased the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in irritable bowel disease patients. "The increased risk of skin cancer that we found in our study was observed in all patients, ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Squamous Cell Carcinoma

People With Bowel Disease at Higher Risk of Blood Clot in Lungs, Legs

Posted 22 Feb 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 – People with inflammatory bowel disease have double the risk of developing a potentially deadly blood clot (venous thromboembolism) in the legs or lungs as do people in the general public, a new study finds. Inflammatory bowel disease includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, both of which can cause abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss and other problems. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) – which includes deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis – affects about two in every 1,000 people a year in the United States and other developed nations. Researchers compared the number of new cases of VTE diagnosed between 1980 and 2007 in nearly 50,000 adults and children with IBD and more than 477,000 members of the general public. After they factored in known VTE risk factors such as a broken bone, cancer, surgery and ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance

Drugs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Might Increase Cancer Risk

Posted 16 Jul 2010 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 19 – The use of thiopurine drugs to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) increases the risk of cancers related to viral infection, according to a new study. IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Thiopurine drugs are used to suppress the immune system in order to maintain remission in IBD patients. For this study, French researchers analyzed data on 19,486 IBD patients (60 percent with Crohn's and 40 percent with ulcerative colitis or unclassified IBD) who were followed for a median of 35 months. At the start of the study, 30 percent of patients were taking thiopurines, 14 percent had discontinued them, and 56 percent had never received thiopurines. During the study, 23 patients developed malignant lymphoproliferative disorders (LD) – cancers that are associated with viral infection, particularly those linked to Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection. Of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Imuran, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Azathioprine, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Mercaptopurine, Purinethol, Azasan, Thioguanine, Tabloid

Virus Plus Gene Mutation Spurs Crohn's Disease in Mice

Posted 24 Jun 2010 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 24 – Mice with a gene variant linked to Crohn's disease only develop the inflammatory bowel disorder if they are infected by a common norovirus called MNV, finds a new study. Noroviruses are a group of viruses that cause gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the stomach lining. Two years ago, the researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and others discovered that mice with an ATG16L1 gene variant associated with Crohn's disease in humans develop similar abnormalities in gut immune cells called Paneth cells. But the mutation alone wasn't enough to trigger Crohn's disease. In a routine screening, the team later found that mice with the gene variant developed Crohn's disease symptoms within seven days after exposure to the MNV norovirus. The study appears in the June 25 issue of the journal Cell. It's been suspected that autoimmune and other ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

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