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Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Blog

Related terms: Cancer, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic, CLL

FDA Expands Use of Imbruvica for Form of Leukemia

Posted 29 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 28, 2014 – Approved use for Imbruvica (ibrutinib) has been expanded to include people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who have a deletion in chromosome 17, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Monday in a news release. People with the 17p deletion are prone to a poor response to standard therapies for CLL, the agency noted. CLL, a form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, generally gets worse over time and leads to a gradual increase in white blood cells called B lymphocytes. Almost 16,000 Americans will be diagnosed with CLL and 4,600 will die from it this year, the FDA said, citing projections from the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The expanded approval followed a clinical study of 391 people, 127 of whom had the 17p deletion. The trial was stopped early after participants treated with Imbruvica showed a 78 percent reduction in risk of disease progression or death, ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Imbruvica

FDA Expands Approved Use of Imbruvica for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Posted 28 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

July 28, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of Imbruvica (ibrutinib) to treat patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who carry a deletion in chromosome 17 (17p deletion), which is associated with poor responses to standard treatment for CLL. Imbruvica received a breakthrough therapy designation for this use. The FDA is also approving new labeling to reflect that Imbruvica’s clinical benefit in treating CLL has been verified. In February 2014, Imbruvica received accelerated approval to treat CLL based on its effect on overall response rate. New clinical trial results examining progression-free survival and overall survival have confirmed the drug’s clinical benefit. A type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, CLL is a rare blood and bone marrow disease that usually gets worse slowly over time, causing a gradual increase in white blood cells cal ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Imbruvica, Ibrutinib

FDA Approves Zydelig (idelalisib) for CLL and Lymphoma

Posted 23 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

July 23, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zydelig (idelalisib) to treat patients with three types of blood cancers. Zydelig is being granted traditional approval to treat patients whose chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has returned (relapsed). Used in combination with Rituxan (rituximab), Zydelig is to be used in patients for whom Rituxan alone would be considered appropriate therapy due to other existing medical conditions (co-morbidities). Zydelig is the fifth new drug with breakthrough therapy designation to be approved by the FDA and the third drug with this designation approved to treat CLL. The FDA is also granting Zydelig accelerated approval to treat patients with relapsed follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (FL) and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), another type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Zydelig is intended to be used in patients who ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma

Zydelig Approved for Three Types of Blood Cancer

Posted 23 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 – Zydelig (idelalisib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat relapsed forms of blood cancer, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (FL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), the FDA said Wednesday in a news release. The approval for the three forms of blood cancer covers instances when the cancer returns despite treatment with at least one other therapy, the agency said. The drug's label will include a boxed warning that the medication could cause liver toxicity, diarrhea, high blood sugar, elevated liver enzymes, high blood triglycerides [a blood fat] and inflammation of the colon (colitis). Other side effects noted during clinical testing included fever, fatigue, nausea, cough, pneumonia, abdominal pain, chills and rash. Zydelig is marketed by Gilead Sciences, based in Foster City, ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma

Experimental Drug May Boost Leukemia Survival, Without Chemo

Posted 12 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 12, 2014 – An experimental drug may extend the lives of people with certain hard-to-treat forms of leukemia and lymphoma – without the need for traditional chemotherapy, according to two studies released Wednesday. The drug, called idelalisib, targets a specific enzyme on white blood cells known as B cells. Researchers found that for people with certain forms of recurrent blood cancers, the drug substantially extended the time that patients lived with no tumor progression. One of the trials, of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), was stopped early because the benefits of idelalisib over standard treatment became so clear. The drug is now up for expedited review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for possible approval. A cancer researcher not involved in either trial called the CLL results "fantastic." If idelalisib is approved, "I think ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Imbruvica Approval Expanded to Include Chronic Leukemia

Posted 12 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 12, 2014 – U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of Imbruvica (ibrutinib) has been expanded to include people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who have tried at least one other anti-cancer therapy. CLL progresses slowly, gradually leading to an increase in white blood cells called B lymphocytes. Last year, some 15,680 Americans were diagnosed with CLL and 4,580 died from it, the agency said Wednesday in a news release, citing the National Cancer Institute. Imbruvica was approved last November to treat people with mantle cell lymphoma. Approval for CLL was based on clinical studies involving 48 people, the FDA said. Some 58 percent of participants had their cancer shrink after treatment. Among the most common side effects of the drug were: low blood platelets, diarrhea, bruising, upper respiratory tract infection, fatigue and muscle pain. Imbruvica is ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Imbruvica, Ibrutinib

FDA Approves Imbruvica to Treat Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Posted 12 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

February 12, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of Imbruvica (ibrutinib) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who have received at least one previous therapy. CLL is a rare blood and bone marrow disease that usually gets worse slowly over time, causing a gradual increase in white blood cells called B lymphocytes, or B cells. The National Cancer Institute estimates that 15,680 Americans were diagnosed and 4,580 died from the disease in 2013. Imbruvica works by blocking the enzyme that allows cancer cells to grow and divide. In November 2013, the FDA granted Imbruvica accelerated approval to treat patients with mantle cell lymphoma, a rare and aggressive type of blood cancer, if those patients received at least one prior therapy. “Today’s approval provides an important new treatment option for CLL patients whose cancer has pro ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Imbruvica, Ibrutinib

FDA Approves Gazyva for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Posted 3 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

November 1, 2013 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Gazyva (obinutuzumab) for use in combination with chlorambucil to treat patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CLL is a blood and bone marrow disease that usually gets worse slowly. According to the National Cancer Institute, 15,680 Americans will be diagnosed and 4,580 will die from the disease this year. Gazyva works by helping certain cells in the immune system attack cancer cells. Gazyva is intended to be used with chlorambucil, another drug used to treat patients with CLL. Gazyva is the first drug with breakthrough therapy designation to receive FDA approval. This designation was requested by the sponsor and granted soon after the biologic license application to support marketing approval was submitted to the FDA. The FDA can designate a drug a breakthrough therapy at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

'Amazing' Therapy Wipes Out Leukemia in Study

Posted 11 Aug 2011 by Drugs.com

NEW YORK (AP) - Scientists are reporting the first clear success with a new approach for treating leukemia - turning the patients' own blood cells into assassins that hunt and destroy their cancer cells. They've only done it in three patients so far, but the results were striking: Two appear cancer-free up to a year after treatment, and the third patient is improved but still has some cancer. Scientists are already preparing to try the same gene therapy technique for other kinds of cancer. "It worked great. We were surprised it worked as well as it did," said Dr. Carl June, a gene therapy expert at the University of Pennsylvania. "We're just a year out now. We need to find out how long these remissions last." He led the study, published Wednesday by two journals, New England Journal of Medicine and Science Translational Medicine. It involved three men with very advanced cases of chronic ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Gene Therapy Fights a Tough-to-Treat Leukemia: Study

Posted 10 Aug 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10 – A small group of patients with an advanced form of tough-to-treat leukemia appears to have benefited from a radical new form of immune therapy, researchers say. To treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that had not responded to other therapies, scientists inserted a genetically modified version of the patients' own T cells (immune cells) into three patients to specifically target the CLL cells. Almost a year later, the patients are in complete or partial remission. This is the first time scientists have successfully used gene transfer therapy to kill cancer cells, and the results might be applicable to other forms of cancer, including ovarian and lung tumors, the researchers said. "This approach to adaptive therapy with T cells is different and better [than previous immunotherapy attempts] because the cells are long-lived once they're transferred and active over ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Study Finds Big Strides Made in Treating Leukemia, Lymphoma in Past Decade

Posted 24 Nov 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 – Clinicians have made remarkable advances in treating blood cancers with bone marrow and blood stem cell transplants in recent years, significantly reducing the risk of treatment-related complications and death, a new study shows. Between the early 1990s and 2007, there was a 41 percent drop in the overall risk of death in an analysis of more than 2,500 patients treated at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle, a leader in the field of blood cancers and other malignancies. Researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, who conducted the study, also noted dramatic decreases in treatment complications such as infection and organ damage. The study was published in the Nov. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine "We have made enormous strides in understanding this very complex procedure and have yielded quite spectacular results," said study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Hairy Cell Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia, Burkitt Lymphoma, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia, Conjunctival Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia

Low Vitamin D Linked to Deterioration in Certain Leukemia Patients

Posted 14 Nov 2010 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 – Patients with a certain type of leukemia who had insufficient vitamin D levels when their cancer was diagnosed saw their disease progress much faster and were two times more likely to die than those with adequate vitamin D levels, a new study finds. Researchers also discovered that increasing vitamin D levels in patients was linked to longer survival times, even after controlling for other factors associated with leukemia progression. This is an important finding for both patients and doctors, according to the researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and the University of Iowa. The disease – chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) – is cancer of the white blood cells (lymphocytes) and mainly affects adults. Although CLL is often diagnosed at an early stage, the standard approach is to wait until patients develop symptoms before beginning chemotherapy, explained ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin D, Vitamin D3, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Cholecalciferol, Ergocalciferol, Drisdol, Calciferol, Delta D3, D3-50, Calcidol, D3-5, D400, D 1000 IU

Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Posted 7 Jun 2010 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 7 – A key component of green tea has shown promise as a non-toxic treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Researchers at the Mayo Clinic are now in the second phase of trials with early-stage, asymptomatic patients to explore the potential of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to strike a blow against this type of leukemia. "The benefits we have seen in most CLL patients who use the chemical suggest that it has modest clinical activity and may be useful for stabilizing this form of leukemia, potentially slowing it down," lead author Dr. Tait Shanafelt, a Mayo Clinic hematologist, said in a news release. Shanafelt's team is slated to present its findings Monday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, in Chicago. The latest research builds on earlier Mayo lab work from eight years ago, during which EGCG's potential to curtail the survival of CLL ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Green Tea

FDA Approves Rituxan to Treat Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Posted 22 Feb 2010 by Drugs.com

ROCKVILLE, Md., Feb. 18, 2010--The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Rituxan (rituximab) to treat certain patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a slowly progressing blood and bone marrow cancer. Rituxan, an anti-cancer drug, is intended for patients with CLL who are beginning chemotherapy for the first time and for those who have not responded to other cancer drugs for CLL. Rituxan is administered with two other chemotherapy drugs, fludarabine and cyclophosphamide. CLL primarily affects people older than 50 and arises from a group of white blood cells known as B-cells—part of the body’s immune system. Each year, about 16,000 people are diagnosed with and 4,400 die from CLL. “Rituxan is the third drug approved for the treatment of CLL since 2008 and underscores FDA’s commitment to expediting the development and approval of drugs for patients with serious and lif ... Read more

Related support groups: Rituxan, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Rituxan Approved for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Posted 21 Feb 2010 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 19 – Rituxan (rituximab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat a slowly progressing form of blood and bone marrow cancer known as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the agency said in a press release. The disease mostly affects people 50 and older. It's diagnosed in some 16,000 people each year, causing about 4,400 deaths, the FDA said. Rituxan binds to the surface of cancer cells, making it easier for the immune system to attack the cancer. The drug was approved for people with CLL who are starting chemotherapy and for those who haven't responded to other anti-cancer drugs. It's administered with two other chemotherapy medications, fludarabine and cyclophosphamide. In a study of 817 people who hadn't been treated previously with chemotherapy, survival without progression of cancer was eight months longer among those given Rituxan and ... Read more

Related support groups: Rituxan, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

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Rituxan, rituximab, Cytoxan, Treanda, cyclophosphamide, bendamustine, Imbruvica, Leukeran, Sandoglobulin, view more... Flebogamma, ibrutinib, immune globulin intravenous, Privigen, chlorambucil, Octagam, Arzerra, fludarabine, Campath, Carimune, Carimune NF, ofatumumab, Cytoxan Lyophilized, Fludara, alemtuzumab, Polygam S / D, Gamimune, Gazyva, Zydelig, Gammaplex, Oforta, Gammagard S / D, Panglobulin NF, Neosar, idelalisib, obinutuzumab, Venoglobulin-S 5%, Venoglobulin-S 10%, Panglobulin, Gamimune N 10%, Gamimune N 5%, Gammar-P IV, Iveegam En