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Cesarean Section Blog

C-Section Birth May Raise Risk of Adult Obesity: Study

Posted 26 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 26, 2014 – Babies born by cesarean section seem more likely to be overweight or obese later in life, a new study contends. The odds of being overweight are 26 percent higher for cesarean babies than those born vaginally, found researchers at Imperial College London, in England. As the number of cesarean deliveries increases in many countries, pregnant women should be advised about the possible long-term consequences, the researchers said. "There are good reasons why C-section may be the best option for many mothers and their babies, and C-sections can, on occasion, be lifesaving," senior study author Neena Modi said in a college news release. "However, we need to understand the long-term outcomes in order to provide the best advice to women who are considering cesarean delivery." Previous studies have suggested that long-term health effects linked to cesarean births ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cesarean Section

Ob/Gyn Groups Issue Guidelines to Lower C-Section Rates

Posted 19 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 19, 2014 – Two major medical groups representing America's obstetricians/gynecologists issued joint guidelines on Wednesday aimed at curbing the overuse of cesarean sections in first-time mothers. One major change: Extending the length of time a woman should be allowed to be in labor, to help lower the odds she will require a C-section. "This is an extremely important initiative to prevent the first cesarean delivery," said one expert, Dr. Joanne Stone, director of maternal-fetal medicine at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. "Multiple cesarean sections put women at higher risks for complications, such as abnormal placental adherence, bleeding and even hysterectomy," she said. Also, "by preventing the first cesarean, we can prevent future cesareans." According to an American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists news release, about one-third of American ... Read more

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First-Time Cesarean Rates Dipped in 2012: CDC

Posted 23 Jan 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2014 – Efforts to curb cesarean birth rates in the United States might be working, with health officials reporting a 2 percent decline in the number of first-time surgical deliveries between 2009 and 2012. Cesarean delivery rates in 19 states reporting to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention averaged 21.9 percent in 2012, the CDC said in a report released Thursday. This represented a return to the rate last recorded for those states in 2006. Report co-author Michelle Osterman, a statistician at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, said the turnaround was significant. "The rates had been going up every year, but in 2009 they either stabilized or started to come down," she said. The real impact might be felt in the overall cesarean rate, Osterman said. "Because primary cesareans are starting to decline, the overall cesarean rate will be ... Read more

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Natural Delivery After a C-Section Often Successful: Study

Posted 20 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 20, 2013 – Nearly two-thirds of women who had a cesarean delivery for their first child were successful when they attempted a natural birth for their second baby, British researchers found. The study, published Nov. 20 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, used data on almost 144,000 British women who had their first baby by C-section between 2004 and 2011. The researchers found that 52 percent of them attempted a vaginal birth for their second baby. "This study shows encouraging results with the majority of women who attempted a natural delivery after a primary C-section being successful," journal deputy editor John Thorp said in a journal news release. Of the women who attempted a vaginal birth for their second baby, 63 percent had a successful delivery. Black women had a lower success rate than white women (50 percent vs. 66 percent), and ... Read more

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Hospitals Enact Policies to Curb Early Childbirth

Posted 6 May 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 6 – Hoping to curb elective Cesarean births and labor inductions, two-thirds of U.S. hospitals have implemented policies to eliminate medically unnecessary pre-term births, a new study reports. Pre-term deliveries (before 39 weeks' gestation) carry an increased risk of neonatal respiratory distress and admission to neonatal intensive care units (NICU), researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine said. For the study, the researchers questioned nearly 2,400 hospitals about their policies on early deliveries that weren't necessary for medical reasons. They found that 66.5 percent of the hospitals had a formal policy against the practice, and more than two-thirds of these hospitals had a "hard-stop" policy, or a strictly enforced rule, against elective deliveries before 39 weeks of gestation. "There is reason to be encouraged that hospital ... Read more

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Hospitals Work to Reduce Unnecessary Early Births

Posted 9 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 9 – Early elective deliveries of babies were significantly reduced at hospitals that implemented quality-improvement programs, according to a new study. These types of deliveries – which include cesarean section and induction of labor without a medical reason – fell 83 percent (from 27.8 percent to 4.8 percent) in the 25 hospitals that took part in the year-long study. The hospitals were located in California, Florida, Illinois, New York and Texas. Together, these five states account for about 38 percent of all births in the United States. The results are good news because babies delivered before full term are at increased risk for serious health problems and death in their first year, according to the March of Dimes, which partially funded the study. "This quality-improvement program demonstrates that we can create a change in medical culture to prevent unneeded early ... Read more

Related support groups: Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Heavier Pregnant Women May Face Higher C-Section Risk

Posted 8 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 8 – Overweight and obese pregnant women are at increased risk for cesarean delivery, according to a new study. Researchers examined data from more than 50,000 women in Norway who gave birth to one child. Women with preeclampsia, high blood pressure, diabetes, gestational diabetes and placenta previa were not included in the study. The findings were published online recently in the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. Women who were overweight and obese before pregnancy had an increased risk of C-section. Those who were extremely obese had the strongest risk of C-section and also had an increased risk of vacuum-extraction delivery. The researchers also found that women who gained 35 pounds or more during pregnancy had a significantly increased risk of forceps, vacuum-extraction and C-section deliveries. This finding was independent of a woman's weight ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cesarean Section

C-Section Rates Vary Widely at U.S. Hospitals

Posted 4 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 4 – Some U.S. hospitals have a rate of cesarean deliveries 10 times higher than other hospitals, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from 593 hospitals with at least 100 births in 2009 and found that cesarean rates at the hospitals ranged from 7.1 percent to 69.9 percent of births. Cesarean delivery is a potentially lifesaving procedure in certain cases, and some differences in hospital rates would be expected based on patient differences, the University of Minnesota researchers said. In order to address this fact, they also examined cesarean rates among a subgroup of lower-risk patients. This included women whose pregnancies were not preterm or breech and did not involve multiple babies, and those with no history of cesarean delivery. Cesarean rates among these women with lower-risk pregnancies – in which a smaller variation might be expected – varied 15-fold, ... Read more

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C-Section May Raise Child's Risk of Allergies, Asthma: Study

Posted 25 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 25 – Babies born by cesarean section are more likely than others to develop allergies, a new study says. Researchers evaluated more than 1,200 newborns when they were 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years old. By age 2, babies born by cesarean section were five times more likely to have allergies than those born naturally when exposed to high levels of common household allergens such as pet dander and dust mites. The findings "further advance the hygiene hypothesis that early childhood exposure to microorganisms affects the immune system's development and onset of allergies," study lead author Christine Cole Johnson, chairwoman of the health sciences department at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, said in a hospital news release. "We believe a baby's exposure to bacteria in the birth canal is a major influencer on their immune system." Babies born by C-section have a pattern ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Cesarean Section

C-Section, Formula May Disrupt 'Good' Gut Bacteria in Babies

Posted 11 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 11 – Being born by cesarean section has been tied to higher risks for various health problems in children, and now a new study finds these babies also have fewer "good" bacteria in their digestive tract. Similarly, babies who were exclusively or even partially formula-fed rather than breast-fed also had markedly different gut flora than babies who were breast-fed, according to the study appearing in the Feb. 11 issue of the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). "Since other [researchers] have found associations between cesarean section delivery or formula-feeding and infant gut changes and conditions like allergy [and] asthma, we speculate that our observations may lead to poor health in later life," said study senior author Anita Kozyrskyj. The findings support current clinical practice guidelines which favor vaginal delivery whenever possible, added Kozyrskyj, who ... Read more

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Multiple C-Sections Linked to Raised Complication Risks: Study

Posted 1 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 1 – Pregnant women who've had multiple cesarean deliveries are at increased risk for complications and preterm deliveries, a new study finds. For the study, British researchers compared 94 women who had five or more cesarean-section deliveries (called multiple repeat cesarean sections) with 175 women who had fewer C-sections. Women in the multiple C-section group were much more likely to have major obstetric hemorrhage (bleeding before, during or after delivery where blood loss exceeds 1,500 milliliters), blood transfusions, preterm delivery, and admission to critical care units. Major obstetric hemorrhage occurred in 18 percent of the women in the multiple C-section group and 0.6 percent of the other women, and blood transfusions were required by 17 percent of the women in the multiple C-section group and 1 percent of the other women, the investigators found. Women in ... Read more

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Children Born by C-Section at Slightly Higher Asthma Risk

Posted 16 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 16 – Children delivered by Cesarean section appear to be at a slight increased risk of developing asthma by age 3, a new study says. The findings support the results of previous research. Researchers analyzed data from more than 37,000 participants in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study in order to compare the health of children who were delivered by planned or emergency C-section with those who were born vaginally. The results showed that children delivered by C-section had a slightly increased risk for asthma at age 3, but no increased risk for wheezing or frequent lower respiratory tract infections. The risk of asthma was highest among those whose mothers did not have allergies. "It is unlikely that a Cesarean delivery itself would cause an increased risk of asthma, rather that children delivered this way may have an underlying vulnerability," study primary ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Cesarean Section

C-Section Rate Drops for First Time in a Decade: CDC

Posted 17 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17 – For the first time in more than a decade, the rate of cesarean deliveries has dropped, a new government report shows. Although the drop reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was small, from 32.9 percent in 2009 to 32.8 percent in 2010, experts say it is further evidence that the increase in cesarean births has finally leveled off. "But with only one data point, we have to wait to see what the future holds before we can make any statements about trends," said report author Brady E. Hamilton, a statistician at the CDC's Division of Vital Statistics. "We have to wait and see what happens." The rate of cesarean delivery had been rising for years because of doctor's concerns over possible complications and malpractice lawsuits. However, many experts feel a full-term, vaginal birth is much better in terms of the infant's development, and recent ... Read more

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C-Sections Linked to Doubled Risk for Blood Clots

Posted 26 Aug 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 26 – The risk of thromboembolism – a potentially fatal condition in which blood clots block blood flow causing damage to the organs – is higher during pregnancy, experts warn. And having a Caesarean section nearly doubles that risk, according to experts at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. As a result, the group issued a new recommendation that all women having a C-section wear inflatable compression devices on their legs at the time of delivery to prevent clots from forming. In more risky cases, the group advised that women also receive anti-clotting medications (anticoagulants). "VTE [venous thromboembolism] is a major contributor to maternal mortality in this country. The risk of VTE is increased during pregnancy and the consequences can be severe," Dr. Andra H. James, who helped develop the guidelines, said in a college news release. "It's ... Read more

Related support groups: Thrombotic/Thromboembolic Disorder, Cesarean Section

C-Section Rate in U.S. Climbs to All-Time High: Report

Posted 19 Jul 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 19 – Between 2002 and 2009, the number of cesarean deliveries rose significantly, from 27 percent of births to 34 percent, finds a new report based on information from 19 U.S. states. "C-sections are rising, and there needs to be a little bit more scrutiny from the person who is having the C-section as well as doctors and hospitals," said report author Dr. Divya Cantor, the senior physician consultant for HealthGrades, the organization that put together the report. HealthGrades is a source for physician information and hospital quality outcomes. The jump in C-sections is a national trend, according to Cantor. "Doctors need to better understand when a C-section is called for," she said. "Patients need to have a better understanding of C-sections and not go into it blindly." Commenting on the report, Dr. Alan Fleischman, medical director of the March of Dimes, said that the ... Read more

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