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Blood Disorders News

2 New Findings Offer Hope for Those With Severe Hemophilia

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Two new studies could pave the way to major changes in how doctors treat severe cases of hemophilia – a rare genetic disorder that can cause uncontrolled bleeding. Both studies tackle a key challenge: Up to one-third of children with severe hemophilia develop antibodies against the standard therapy. But one study highlights the value of an old therapy, while the other shows promising early results with an experimental drug. Experts said both should stir discussion among doctors, patients and parents who deal with hemophilia. But they were especially hopeful about the new drug, known as emicizumab. In the United States, about 20,000 people – mostly boys and men – are living with hemophilia, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disorder is caused by a defect in one of the genes that controls proteins needed for normal blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Hemophilia A, Hemophilia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Hemophilia B, Blood Cell Transplantation, Hemophilia A with Inhibitors

Restoring Blood Flow Beats Exercise for Poor Leg Circulation

Posted 5 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 – For people with poor circulation in their leg arteries, a medical procedure to restore blood flow may have greater benefits than exercise, preliminary research suggests. People with peripheral artery disease (PAD) experience pain and fatigue while walking. These symptoms develop because poor circulation in the arteries that supply blood to the limbs causes damage and scarring in the muscles, the researchers explained. There is currently no way to reverse the scarring associated with PAD. But a procedure to reopen or bypass blockages in the blood vessels and restore blood flow to the limbs – also known as revascularization – prevents it from getting worse, the researchers said. For the study, the researchers analyzed levels of a protein, called TGF-Beta1, that triggers scarring in patients with severe PAD. The investigators also measured levels of collagen, ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Health Tip: Donating Blood

Posted 2 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Typically, you must be at least 17 years old and meet a few health criteria to donate blood. If you're able, it's a great way to help save lives. The American Red Cross offers this advice on what to expect: One blood donation can help save the lives of three other people. The donation procedure is safe and easy. While the donation itself only takes about 10 minutes, expect to be at the donation center for about an hour. Prepare for donation by making sure you're well-hydrated. Eat a nutritious meal, skipping any foods that are high in fat. Make sure your shirt sleeves can be rolled up above the elbows. Bring your driver's license or a donor ID card. If you're 16 and donating in a state that allows it, bring signed parental consent. Also bring a list of any medications you take. If you're feeling sick beforehand, reschedule the donation. Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

FDA Approves Experimental Zika Test for Blood Donations

Posted 31 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 – An experimental test to check blood donations for the Zika virus has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The decision to allow use of the test in areas with active mosquito-borne transmission of the virus means that collections of whole blood and blood component donations will be able to resume in Puerto Rico, agency officials said. "The availability of an investigational test to screen donated blood for Zika virus is an important step forward in maintaining the safety of the nation's blood supply, especially for those U.S. territories already experiencing active transmission," Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, said Wednesday. "In the future, should Zika virus transmission occur in other areas, blood collection establishments will be able to continue to collect blood and use the ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Blood Transfusion, Blood Cell Transplantation, Zika Virus Infection

Review Finds Mixed Success With Hemophilia Treatment

Posted 16 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 – Though the past 50 years have brought major treatment advances, men with severe hemophilia are still at high risk for bleeding and physical disability, experts say. Hemophilia is a genetic disease that prevents blood from clotting normally, leading to an increased risk of serious bleeding. More common in men than in women, it affects about one out of every 5,000 men, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 7,500 male hemophilia patients in the United States between 1998 and 2011. Their findings were published online March 16 in the journal Blood. "Our analysis provides a snapshot of how improvements in care have translated into outcomes across different generations of men with hemophilia," study author Dr. Paul Monahan said in a journal news release. Monahan is a former professor of hematology ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Hemophilia A, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Hemophilia B, Hemophilia, Hemophilia A with Inhibitors

Could a Clot-Busting Drug Help Treat a 'Bleeding' Stroke?

Posted 18 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 18, 2016 – In what one expert called a "counterintuitive" finding, research suggests that the powerful clot-busting drug known as tPA might help patients suffering a hemorrhagic ("bleeding") stroke. According to the American Stroke Association, only about 15 percent of strokes are caused by runaway bleeding in the brain; the other 85 percent are caused by a clot. And while it makes sense to use the clot-busting tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to break up a brain clot, it would seem counterproductive to use the same drug in the case of a bleeding stroke. However, two new studies to be presented Thursday at the stroke association's annual meeting in Los Angeles suggest that tPA may, indeed, have a role to play in the treatment of a bleeding stroke. Both studies were funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. One study involved 500 ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Blood Transfusion, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Diagnosis and Investigation, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Streptokinase, Urokinase, Abbokinase Open-Cath, Kinlytic, Abbokinase, Kabikinase, Streptase

FDA: Wait a Month to Donate Blood After Travel to Zika-Prone Areas

Posted 17 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 16, 2016 – To protect the U.S. blood supply, people who've traveled to places where the Zika virus is prevalent, or who have symptoms that suggest infection, should wait a month before donating blood, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday. Four weeks is enough time for the virus to pass through a person's system, the agency said. The mosquito-borne Zika virus is thought – but not proven – to be behind an epidemic of birth defects that leave newborns with very small heads and possible brain damage. According to the FDA, people considered to be at risk for Zika include those who have: Traveled to areas with active transmission of Zika virus during the past four weeks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now lists 30 countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean as places with active Zika infection. Engaged in sexual ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Blood Cell Transplantation

New Immune Therapy Achieves Complete Remission in Blood Cancer Patients

Posted 16 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

A new therapy that uses a person's immune system to attack tumors led to complete remission in terminally ill blood cancer patients, according to researchers. In a clinical trial, symptoms vanished in 94 percent of leukemia patients who received the treatment. The response rate was more than 80 percent in patients with other blood cancers, and half achieved total remission, CNBC reported. The results were presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Detailed data will be published later this year. They therapy involves removing immune system T-cells from patients, loading them with anti-cancer molecules, and placing them back in the body. The altered T-cells then seek and destroy cancer, CNBC reported. The results are unprecedented, according to researcher Stanley Riddell. "In the laboratory and in clinical trials, we are seeing ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

Neanderthal DNA May Play Role in Modern Human Health

Posted 12 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2016 – Neanderthal DNA has a subtle but significant impact on modern human health, including nicotine addiction, depression and blood clotting, a new study suggests. It's been known since 2010 that between 1 percent and 4 percent of DNA in people with Eurasian ancestry is from Neanderthals. But the impact of that genetic inheritance has been unclear. To learn more, researchers compared Neanderthal DNA in the genetic material of 28,000 adults of European ancestry with their health records. "We discovered associations between Neanderthal DNA and a wide range of traits, including immunological, dermatological, neurological, psychiatric and reproductive diseases," study senior author John Capra said in a Vanderbilt University news release. Capra is an evolutionary geneticist and assistant professor of biological sciences at Vanderbilt. The researchers confirmed that ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Blood Disorders, Smoking, Smoking Cessation

Blood Donors Needed After East Coast Storm: Red Cross

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 – Jonas, the massive snowstorm that hammered the East Coast, has led to a shortage of blood products and there is an emergency need for both blood and platelet donors, the American Red Cross said Tuesday. "The impact of this weekend's winter storm continues to affect multiple states along the East Coast, and more blood drives will likely be canceled. Right now, blood products are being distributed to hospitals as quickly as donations come in," the Red Cross said in a news release. Since Jan. 1, severe winter weather has led to the cancellation of more than 300 blood drives in 20 states, resulting in about 9,500 fewer donations to an already low winter supply, the Red Cross noted. Blood products can be transported where and when they are most needed, so donors in areas unaffected by the winter storm are encouraged to make blood and platelet donations, the Red ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

Low Bicarbonate Levels May Be a Danger for Seniors

Posted 15 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2016 – Seniors who are healthy but have low blood levels of bicarbonate are at higher risk for premature death, a new study contends. Bicarbonate plays an important role in maintaining the body's pH balance. Fruits and vegetables are a source of bicarbonate. Researchers looked at nearly 2,300 Americans, ages 70 to 97, who were followed for an average of just over 10 years. During that time, those who were healthy and had normal or high bicarbonate levels had a similar risk of dying, but those with low bicarbonate levels had a 24 percent increased risk of death. The study was published online Jan. 14 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. "What we found was that generally healthy older people with low levels of bicarbonate had a higher risk of death," study author Dr. Kalani Raphael, from the University of Utah, said in a journal news release. ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders

The Pill, Hormone Therapy Safe for Women Taking Blood Thinners: Study

Posted 22 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 22, 2015 – Women on blood thinners can also take contraceptives that contain estrogen, or hormone replacement therapy, without raising their risk for blood clots or uterine bleeding, a new Italian study finds. Currently, women diagnosed with blood clots may be advised to stop hormone therapy or use of the contraceptive pill – even if they are already on a blood thinner. The reason: Doctors are often concerned that these drug combinations might raise the patient's risk for more clots. However, "there has been no evidence to support this decision," said the study's senior author, Dr. Ida Martinelli, of the A. Bianchi Bonomi Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center in Milan. "We conducted this study to address the fear felt by both the physician and patient when making the decision to stop or continue hormone therapy in this setting," she explained in a news release from the ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Emergency Contraception, Warfarin, Hot Flashes, Coumadin, Estradiol, Menopausal Disorders, Xarelto, Premarin, Postcoital Contraception, Pradaxa, Ethinyl Estradiol, Estrace, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Lovenox, Eliquis, Vivelle

FDA Lifts Ban on Blood Donations by Gay Men

Posted 21 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 21, 2015 – Gay and bisexual men who have abstained from sex for one year will now be allowed to donate blood in the United States. The new policy, announced Monday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, reverses a three-decades-old ban on donations from this group of men that traces back to the start of the AIDS epidemic. "The FDA's responsibility is to maintain a high level of blood product safety for people whose lives depend on it," FDA Acting Commissioner Stephen Ostroff said in an agency news release. "We have taken great care to ensure this policy revision is backed by sound science and continues to protect our blood supply." The FDA said it was changing its policy based on data from other countries that show allowing such donations would not increase the risk of HIV-tainted blood entering America's blood supply. FDA officials have estimated that about half of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Harvoni, HIV Infection, Valtrex, Anemia, Acyclovir, Tamiflu, Atripla, Ribavirin, Valacyclovir, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, Incivek, Blood Transfusion, Zovirax, Truvada, Stribild, Complera, Triumeq, Baraclude

Gene Therapy Shows Early Potential for Rare Immune System Disorder

Posted 7 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 5, 2015 – Gene therapy might restore immunity in children and young adults with a rare inherited immune system disorder called X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, researchers report in a small study. The condition, which primarily affects males, is caused by mutations in the IL2RG gene that prevent normal development and function of infection-fighting immune cells. Patients are at high risk for life-threatening infections, according to background information with the study. This early study was designed to test the safety and effectiveness of the procedure. Much more work is needed before the treatment could be approved for patients. Currently, the most effective treatment is a transplant of blood-forming stem cells from a genetically matched sibling. Patients without a matched sibling often receive transplants from a parent, but this only partially restores their ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Diagnosis and Investigation

Health Tip: Know Your Risk for Deep Vein Thrombosis

Posted 4 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

-- A dangerous condition called deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot develops in a vein deep inside the body. The U.S. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute mentions these potential risk factors: Having had a previous DVT, or taking medication that thickens the blood or promotes clotting. Having had surgery, a broken bone or other injury that affects a deep vein. Having reduced blood flow to a deep vein as a result of inactivity. Typical causes are post-surgical recovery, or taking a long trip that limits your ability to move around. Being pregnant. Being treated for cancer. Having a central venous catheter. Being over the age of 60, being a smoker or being obese. Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Warfarin, Coumadin, Xarelto, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pradaxa, Lovenox, Eliquis, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Heparin, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Recurrent Event, Enoxaparin, Rivaroxaban, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery, Clexane, Fragmin, Apixaban, Arixtra, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis

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