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Bacterial Infection News

Related terms: Infection, Bacterial

FDA Orders Studies on Contaminated Endoscopes Tied to Illness Outbreaks

Posted 23 hours ago by

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 – Recent outbreaks of life-threatening infections linked to endoscopic devices called duodenoscopes led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday to order manufacturers to conduct postmarket studies of the devices in health care facilities. The goal is to learn more about how the scopes are cleaned and prepared for reuse in actual health care settings, the FDA said. Duodenoscopes are flexible, lighted tubes threaded through the mouth, throat and stomach to the small intestine, and used to diagnose and treat problems in the liver, pancreas and gallbladder. Last February, the FDA issued a warning that duodenoscopes are hard to clean even when health care workers follow manufacturers' directions. In March, the FDA issued final recommendations for the cleaning and sterilization of duodenoscopes. That action came shortly after reports that duodenoscopes ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Endoscopy or Radiology Premedication

New Antibiotic-Resistant 'Superbug' an Emerging Threat, CDC Says

Posted 1 day 2 hours ago by

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 – A relatively new antibiotic-resistant bacteria called CRE is making inroads in some major American cities, U.S. health officials report. Surveillance of seven U.S. metropolitan areas found higher-than-expected levels of CRE in Atlanta, Baltimore and New York City, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lower-than-expected levels were found in Albuquerque, Denver and Portland, Ore., while the Minneapolis rate was what the agency anticipated. But CDC researchers were dismayed that they found active cases of CRE infection in every city they examined, said senior author Dr. Alexander Kallen, a CDC medical officer. The results support the CDC's decision to promote coordinated regional efforts to prevent the spread of CRE and other antibiotic-resistant germs, Kallen said. "Here we are with an opportunity to intervene on one of these ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Metronidazole, Bacterial Infection, Bactrim, Flagyl, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Bactrim DS, Polymyxin B, Skin and Structure Infection, Xifaxan, Septra, Rifaximin, Bacitracin, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Septra DS, Metro, Chloramphenicol, Cotrimoxazole, Sulfatrim

Household Dust Harbors Thousands of Microbial Species

Posted 26 Aug 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 – You've got a lot of unsuspected roommates: A new study finds that ordinary house dust contains thousands of species of bacteria and fungi. The researchers analyzed dust from about 1,200 homes across the continental United States, and found that the dust in each home contained an average of more than 5,000 species of bacteria and about 2,000 species of fungi. "Every day, we're surrounded by a vast array of organisms in our homes, most of which we can't see," study co-author Noah Fierer, associate professor in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado at Boulder, said in a university news release. "We live in a microbial zoo, and this study was an attempt to catalog that diversity," he added. "Geography is the best predictor of fungi in your home," Fierer said. "The reason is that most fungi blow in from outdoors via soil ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Infection, Fungal Infection Prophylaxis

What's the Best Method for Cleaning Hospital Rooms?

Posted 10 Aug 2015 by

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 – Concerns about hospital "superbugs" have spotlighted the need to prevent the spread of germs in health-care settings. But a new report reveals a disturbing lack of knowledge on something as basic as proper cleaning of a patient's room. Very little research addresses the best ways to disinfect and sanitize the hard surfaces in a hospital room, investigators report in the Aug. 11 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. "We basically found that there are studies available to guide actions, but there are much fewer than you might expect for such an important issue," said lead author Dr. Craig Umscheid, an assistant professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia. At any given time, about one in every 25 hospital patients has an infection they got from being at a hospital, according to the U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection

Better Control of Drug-Resistant Germs Could Save Thousands of Lives: CDC

Posted 4 Aug 2015 by

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 – An immediate, focused effort to halt the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs could save tens of thousands of lives and prevent hundreds of thousands of new infections over the next five years, a new government report suggests. As many as 37,000 lives could be saved, and 619,000 new infections prevented, if community health departments and health care facilities form tight support networks to quickly identify and address emerging outbreaks of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, said report author Dr. John Jernigan. He directs the Office of HAI (Health care-Associated Infections) Prevention Research and Evaluation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "When health care facilities and health departments in a community work together to share information about resistance, and then use that information to guide and target prevention efforts, then we ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, Metronidazole, Bacterial Infection, Clindamycin, Bactrim, Azithromycin, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Flagyl, Zithromax, Erythromycin, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Lamisil, Nitrofurantoin, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection

Septic Tanks May Allow Fecal Matter Into Lakes, Rivers

Posted 3 Aug 2015 by

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 – Septic tanks don't prevent fecal bacteria from seeping into rivers and lakes, according to a new study that dispels a widely held belief that they can. "All along, we have presumed that on-site wastewater disposal systems, such as septic tanks, were working," Joan Rose, a water expert at Michigan State University, said in a university news release. "But in this study, sample after sample, bacterial concentrations were highest where there were higher numbers of septic systems in the watershed area," she said. Rose and her colleagues analyzed samples from 64 river systems in Michigan. The study was published in the Aug. 3 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Many areas of the United States rely on septic tanks to dispose of human sewage, including Michigan, Florida and South Carolina, the researchers said. They also noted that ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Infection

Climate Change May Be Pushing 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba to Northern Lakes

Posted 24 Jul 2015 by

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 – A deadly "brain-eating" amoeba that lives in freshwater sources may be surviving in more northern areas of the United States thanks to climate change, health experts suggest. Minnesota health officials are still trying to confirm if the death of a Minnesota teen this summer was caused by the single-celled organism Naegleria fowleri. If confirmed, it would be the northernmost infection of Naegleria fowleri ever reported, according to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. The amoeba normally lives in warmer waters in the southern United States. But since climate change is generally making summers hotter, the amoeba now seems to be in northern waters, said Dr. Bruce Hirsch, an infectious diseases specialist at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. "Climate change may be playing a role," he said. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention referred to ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Amebiasis, Dientamoeba fragilis

Antibiotic May Lower Effect of Some Blood Thinners

Posted 21 Jul 2015 by

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 – The antibiotic dicloxacillin may lessen the effects of some blood-thinning medications, new research shows. "The surprise in the study was just how much of an impact dicloxacillin had," said study author Anton Pottegard, a pharmacist and research fellow at the University of Southern Denmark, in Odense. "Often, the effects in these kinds of studies are quite small. But this was very pronounced: Six out of 10 patients dropped so much in their level of blood-thinning that they were no longer sufficiently protected against clotting and stroke," Pottegard said. Coumadin (warfarin) and similar blood thinners lower the risk of blood clots, a potential cause of strokes and heart attacks, by thinning the blood so blockages don't form in vessels, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Patients with irregular heart rhythms, such as atrial fibrillation, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Blood Disorders, Warfarin, Coumadin, Metronidazole, Bacterial Infection, Bactrim, Ischemic Stroke, Atrial Fibrillation, Flagyl, Bactrim DS, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Polymyxin B, Xifaxan, Septra, Zyvox, Rifaximin, Bacitracin, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis

Beach Sand, Not Water, More Likely to Make You Sick

Posted 17 Jul 2015 by

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 – Heading to the beach this weekend? A new study finds that when it comes to germs, beachgoers may have more to fear from the sand they sit on than the water they swim in. Studies done with water and sand from Hawaiian beaches found a "higher abundance" of bacteria indicating fecal contamination – bugs such a E. coli, for example – in the sand than in the water. In fact, "wastewater-contaminated marine beach sand may act as a chronic source of wastewater bacteria to the beach seawater," writes a team led by Tao Yan of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Public health experts have long known that wastewater from sewage and other sources can contaminate seawater, some days necessitating beach closures. Swimmers who come into contact with or accidentally swallow fecal-contaminated water can suffer stomach ache, diarrhea and rashes, Yan's team noted. However, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Infection Prophylaxis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Tattoos May Pose Health Risks, Researchers Report

Posted 28 May 2015 by

THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 – Getting a tattoo may put you at risk for long-term skin problems, a new study warns. "We were rather alarmed at the high rate of reported chronic complications tied to getting a tattoo," said senior investigator Dr. Marie Leger, an assistant professor in the dermatology department at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Given the growing popularity of tattoos, physicians, public health officials and consumers need to be aware of the risks involved," Leger said in a Langone news release. For the study, researchers surveyed about 300 New York City adults, aged 18 to 69, with tattoos. Most of them had no more than five tattoos, and the arm was the most popular tattoo site (67 percent). Up to 6 percent of the study participants experienced some form of tattoo-related rash, infection, severe itching or swelling that sometimes lasted longer than four months. ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Skin Infection, Eczema, Dermatitis, Bacterial Skin Infection, Contact Dermatitis, Skin and Structure Infection, Atopic Dermatitis, Secondary Cutaneous Bacterial Infections

FDA Approves New Formulation of Minocin (minocycline) for Injection

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by

PARSIPPANY, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr. 20, 2015-- The Medicines Company (NASDAQ:MDCO) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for a new formulation of Minocin (minocycline) for Injection. The FDA has also granted Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) designation for the new formulation of Minocin for Injection under the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now Act (GAIN Act). The designation, the third granted to a product in the Company’s infectious disease portfolio, would qualify Minocin for Injection for priority review and five years of marketing exclusivity upon an approval of the additional potential indications. Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter is considered to be a serious antimicrobial resistance threat by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDC estimates the number of d ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Infection, Minocycline, Minocin

Simpler Antibiotic Regimen Helps Sick Babies in Developing Nations

Posted 2 Apr 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 – Newborns and young infants in developing nations who have suspected severe bacterial infections can be effectively treated outside a hospital, two new studies suggest. The findings indicate that the World Health Organization's guidelines on treating newborns and young infants with possible bacterial infections – such as pneumonia and sepsis (blood infection) – should be altered, the researchers said. About one in five babies worldwide develops severe bacterial infections during the first month of life, leading to about 700,000 deaths in newborns every year, the researchers explained. Current WHO guidelines recommend that newborns and young infants believed to have such infections be hospitalized and treated with antibiotic injections for at least seven to 10 days. However, many parents in developing nations can't afford, or don't have access to, such ... Read more

Related support groups: Amoxicillin, Bacterial Infection, Pneumonia, Amoxil, Sepsis, Amoxil Pediatric Drops, Biomox, Trimox, Moxatag, DisperMox, Apo-Amoxi, Moxilin, Wymox, Amoxicot

FDA Tightens Rules on Endoscopes Tied to 'Superbug' Outbreaks

Posted 12 Mar 2015 by

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday issued final recommendations for the cleaning and sterilization of medical devices used in invasive procedures. The updated rules, first proposed in 2011, were released in response to last month's reports of seven serious infections and two deaths at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, which were caused by duodenoscopes contaminated with a "superbug." On March 4, four similar "superbug" infections were reported at Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. Duodenoscopes are devices used to diagnose and treat problems in the liver, pancreas and gallbladder. The FDA and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "have been devoting a great deal of effort to understand the circumstances and reasons for the episodes of drug-resistant bacterial infections associated with duodenoscopes," Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection

2 Deaths, Scores of Potential 'Superbug' Infections at UCLA Med Center

Posted 19 Feb 2015 by

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 – At least 100 patients may have been exposed to medical devices contaminated with a "superbug" at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, where the devices are already believed to be responsible for seven serious infections, including two deaths. Endoscopes that were used to perform digestive procedures between October and January were contaminated with Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), hospital officials said Thursday. The hospital said about 100 patients may have been exposed to the contaminated devices. The Associated Press reported that 180 patients might be at risk. Free home-testing kits are being delivered to all potentially infected patients, and UCLA will analyze the results, the medical center said. The two endoscopes thought responsible for the infections were used in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic and bile duct ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Infection Prophylaxis

1 in 5 Sore Throats Tied to Scary Bacteria, Study Finds

Posted 16 Feb 2015 by

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 – A potentially deadly bacteria is responsible for one in five sore throats in young adults, a new study suggests. Patients with this bacteria – Fusobacterium necrophorum – can get negative results on a strep test, but be at risk of an abscess that blocks the airway, researchers report. "If it looks like strep but it isn't strep, it could be this," said study author Dr. Robert Centor, a professor of medicine at the University of Alabama School of Medicine at Birmingham. Most sore throats get better without treatment, Centor said. But antibiotics should be prescribed when a patient "has a sore throat with fever, difficulty swallowing and swollen tonsils but a negative strep test," he said. In this study of young people aged 15 to 30, researchers found that more than 20 percent of the sore throats were caused by F. necrophorum – more than the number caused by ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Infection, Strep Throat

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